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601 Top of Form 1 Couch, Gray, Skaggs,: Wabash Co., IL

Posted by:
Kenneth L. Gray Date: October 08, 2000 at 19:54:53
of 196
Bottom of Form 1

Searching for information to extend my data on my family history. Wade Couch (1861-1922) married Ella Skaggs (b.1866) Their daughter Hattie Couch was my grandmother and married Ernest Gray. Ernest's father was Wilson Gray, and his father was Daniel Parker Gray who married Lucy Crackel. Gray, Crackel, and Couch were frequent surnmes in Wabash, Edwards, and White counties of Illinois.
Does anyone recognize these people? Can you extend my family history data?

Thank you.
Kenneth L. Gray

 
COUCH, Hattie Mable (I4455)
 
602
Ebenezer Couch, Sr. is a D.A.R. certified veteran of the American Revolutionary War, serving for Connecticut: A026419
 
Couch, Ebenezer Sr. (I2767)
 
603
George Higgins is a D.A.R. certified veteran of the American Revolutionary War, serving for Connecticut: A208113
 
Higgins, George W. (I4603)
 
604
Israel Higgins is a D.A.R. certified veteran of the American Revolutionary War, serving for Connecticut: A055292
 
HIGGINS, Israel (I5197)
 
605
John Wood, Jr. is a D.A.R. certified veteran of the American Revolutionary War, serving for Connecticut: A026420
 
Couch, Capt. Ebenezer Jr. (I2765)
 
606
Alexander Ogle is a D.A.R. certified veteran of the American Revolutionary War, serving for Maryland: A085796
 
Ogle, Alexander (I13024)
 
607
John Wood, Sr. is a D.A.R. certified veteran of the American Revolutionary War, serving for Vermont: A128000
 
Wood, John Sr. (I3139)
 
608

OBITUARY.
Governor William Walker.
Wyandott Herald of February 19, 1874


  The distinguished gentleman whose name heads this article was for many years as well known in Kansas as any citizen in the State.
  He was born at Gibralter, Michigan, March 5th, 1799, and died at the residence of Mr. H. H. Smalley in Kansas City, Mo., on Friday, the 13th inst., having accomplished seventy-five years of useful and eventful life.
  Governor Walker received a thorough education at Worthington, Ohio, under the immediate instruction of the venerable Bishop Chase.
  After acquiring his education, William Walker entered almost at once upon an active life in behalf of the North American Indians in general, and of the Wyandott Nation in particular, among whom he became leader and counselor, devoting the best years of his life to their interests.
  As early as 1831 he visited the "Platte Purchase" as agent of the Wyandott Nation with a view to purchasing a new location for it. He was at the treaty of St, Marys and rendered efficient services to all contracting parties.
  He was for some years the private Secretary and friend of Gen. Lewis Cass, his secretaryship beginning after the close of the war of 1812, and the friendship continuing until the death of the General.
  In 1843 William Walker came to Kansas with his tribe, where he has remained ever since, except when he was called away on business or for his health which for some years has been feeble.
  He acquired his title of Governor in 1853, when he was appointed Provisional Governor of Kansas Territory,
  With him died more Indian archaeological knowledge than has been preserved by any writer on the subject. Indian antiquity and history were his special study, and being an Indian hi^iself, highly educated and with a natural taste in that direction, his success was not surprising.
  He furnished Schoolcraft with a large amount of information contained in his works on the Indians of North America, and also gave General Butterfield many incidents contained in his new work on Crawford's campaign against Sandusky.
  Governor Walker wrote much himself for newspapers and periodicals but unfortunately has left none of the results of his deep research in a form to be used by the historian or antiquary.
  He was buried on Saturday last in Oak Grove Cemetery, with Masonic honors, having been one of the Charter Members of Wyandott Lodge No. 3, and for many years an honorary member thereof.
  So has passed away one of our oldest and most valued citizens.
               The Journals of Gov. William Walker, 1902.
 
Walker, Gov. William (I7091)
 
609
Although I've found no years-compatible Ohio marriage for Joseph Whaley & Elizabeth, there is an 1824 marriage of Joseph Wiley and Elizabeth Wiley in Belmont Co, OH (just east of Zanesville, Muskingum Co, OH). It is possible that this is Joseph Whaley. This marriage in 1824 is a couple years before the first child by the Whaley couple is reported.
 
Family F696
 
610
The birthplace of Joseph Bevis, Engineer, is unclear:
  • 1850 Putnam census shows Joseph Bevis as born in Indiana
  • 1860 Putnam census shows him as born in New Jersey
    • same man
    • same wife
    • same children
  • 1870 census, Joseph is not found
  • 1880 census shows Joseph as born in Delaware...living with his second wife, Ann Partridge.
 
Bevis, Joseph Curtis (I16083)
 
611
Albert's death certificate states his birth date as 15 Mar 1917. Very likely, this is a transcription error. Since this would make his mother 60 or greater at his birth, it is believed this is in error. This is confirmed by the 1910 census (on pg.2 of 2), in which he is given as age 3, placing his birth year at 1907. (Birth also given as March 7, 1906-07.)
 
Saddler, Albert Newton (I5072)
 
612
I've found no documentation of parents for William V. Adkins (Atkins, Atkinson). Long-standing information of his parents as John Thomas Adkins, Jr. and Elizabeth Bromwell (presented on this site and many others for many years) have contradicting evidence suggesting these were not his parents.

The William Atkins/Adkins born 28 March 1689, was born in Sandy, Bedfordshire, England and was buried there 9 September 1704, preceded by both his parents, who were also buried there (i.e.-not in Virginia).
(full volume available at archive.org)

William Atkins, son of John Adkins, England

(but not William V. Adkins, Sr. of Virginia)
 
Adkins, William V. Sr. (I5396)
 
613
Presented for a long time as the parents of Ora Ella Skaggs, James M. Scaggs & Elizabeth Compton are not Ella's parents. An Ella Scaggs does show in the 1870 census with these parents. Either that is a different Ella Scaggs/Skaggs, or perhaps James M. Scaggs is the brother of Ella's father, Thomas Scaggs, and perhaps has adopted his brother's children. Because that is a possibility, their record and lineage is still maintained on this site. If further research reveals this is not the case (i.e.-that it is a different Ella), their information will be removed. Ora Ella Skaggs, aka Orrie Ella Scaggs, was born to Thomas Scaggs/Skaggs & Mary Turner. Thomas's own marriage used the spelling Scaggs, but in the record of the of his son, James L. Skaggs, the Skaggs spelling was used.
 
Family F28087
 
614
CAUTION: The popular, common story about Parker Adkins & Blue Sky daughter of Cornstalk appear to be false. See research provided here in a PDF (opens in a new tab):

Parker Adkins & Blue Sky story: REFUTATION
 
Family F27797
 
615
Extreme Caution: Although often cited as his parents, evidence suggests that these are not the parents of William V. Atkins/Adkins/Atkinson. See disambiguation PDF provided on William's page. This lineage of ancestors has been intentionally orphaned from the main Adkins/Atkins line of William V. Adkins, Sr.
 
Family F25152
 
616
Information about Darius Nash Couch having a son named Robert apparently came from a mis-copying of a transcription of Appletons Cyclopædia of American Biographies, pages 753-754 (James Grant Wilson & John Fiske, 1887). The information about a son named Robert Jackson on those pages actually refers to Robert Jackson Coudin (Cowdin), whose son Robert did exist and died at the Battle of Cold Harbor. By all verifiable accounts and modern day testimony of his direct descendants, Darius never had a son named Robert.
 
Family F21418
 
617
• Euna's 1952 delayed birth certificate, filed when she was 60 years old (done by recollection and records which often vary), gives her father's name as William Willington Plumley, whereas his name was William Wiley Plumley. Notice on the certificate that his name was initially entered as simply William Willington, and later, Plumley was entered as a correction.
• This same certificate also cites an affidavit by her Aunt Edna Todd; however, Edna Todd was actually Mary Edna Plumley Todd, her older sister (married to James Oliver Todd).
 
Plumley, Euna Pearl (I16545)
 
618
John was born to Jacob and Margaret Miller from Hesse, Germany in Falkner's Swamp north of Philadelphia. He was christened at the Tulpehocken Lutheran Church in Berks County on November 23, 1733. His family moved to Linville Creek in the Shenandoah Valley about 1750, nearly the same time the Lincolns and Boones also moved there from Berks County. John then married Barbara Mauzy of Fauquier County about 1765. They moved their family to Indian Creek near Greenville in what was then Botetourt County, Virginia, probably after his father Jacob had died in 1772 and maybe with Valentine Cook of Linville Creek in 1773. John helped build Cook's Fort 1/4 mile west of Greenville, where some of their 10 children were born. This Fort was used to muster the Botetourt County Militia for the Point Pleasant Battle in 1774 and was a refuge from the Indians whenever they attacked. Their farm grew to 983 acres in what became Monroe County in 1799 and their Miller-Pence Farm and Miller-Halstead Cemetery were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2006.

Oren Frederick Morton's 1916 book "A History of Monroe County" says John once thought he could see a plumed head from a distance as he heard a turkey gobbling noise. Thinking an Indian was trying to lure him from his house, he went out the back door with his rifle, took a circuit of nearly a mile, then came up behind the still gobbling Indian and shot and scalped him. Morton also said Panther Hollow on Indian Creek was named when John heard a piece of bark fall from a tree and looked up to see a panther ready to spring, so he quickly fired and killed it.

In 1777, John served in the Revolutionary War with Captain John Preston in the Montgomery County Militia and is #A208591 in the DAR Register, which has his birthdate as ca1735. In 1780, he also served as a Greenbrier County juror after it was formed in 1777. John was then buried as J. M. in the Miller-Halstead Cemetery, when he died in 1826 at the age of 93.
 
Miller, John Sr. (I10610)
 
619
Obituary Transcription:
Advanced Monticellonian, 20 August 1903

Mr. T. E. Lamb one of the old settlers of this county died at the home of his son-in-law, Mr. Will King, Luella, Ark., on last Tuesday Morning. Mr. Lamb was 83 years old, and has been a citizen of this county for 50 years or more, where he spent his time engaged in farming. He has ever been a good citizen, quiet and peaceable. He leaves one son, Mr. Jeff Lamb of this county and several daughters besides other relatives and feiends to mourn his death.
 
Lamb, Thomas Edward (I111)
 
620
It has been discovered that Arthur Richmond, husband of Mary Plumley, was not the Private A. Richmond, sometimes incorrectly presented as Arthur Richmond, who served in the Civil War under Capt. L.D. Garten, West Virginia State Troops. The military gravestone erected and the documentation for it, were incorrectly assigned to Arthur and his gravesite. Private A. Richmond died in 1865; whereas Arthur died around 1862-1863.
   — Information from the person who applied and had the stone created and placed.
 
Richmond, Arthur (I5383)
 
621
02 July 2019—Inquiry sent to "T", the creator of the findagrave.com profile for the mother of Ellen T. Fitzpatrick, as Ellen Fitzpatrick (nee unknown). Research for the parents of Ellen's husband, James Holmes Hutchinson, yielded no results. His and possibly her parents may be deleted from the lineage soon, if no documentation found.—Doug
 
Family F861
 
622
As of 02 July 2019, research by Doug Couch has produced no source documentation connecting Robert Hutchinson & Frances (surname unknown) to our lineage as parents of James Holmes Hutchinson. Searches which would normally access censuses and other documents showing this did not produce results.
 
Family F860
 
623
As of 21 June 2019, research by Doug Couch has produced no source documentation connecting William D. Campbell & Jane Stout to our lineage as parents of William Stewart Campbell. Various family trees show this connection; however, those viewed did not give any source documentation. Searches which would normally access censuses and other documents showing this did not produce results.
 
Family F868
 
624
CRITICAL #1: The records cited by myself and others do not prove that the Elizabeth Claypoole who married William Pettyjohn was from these Claypoole roots. Closer examination reveals the following:

James Claypoole, son of Sir John Claypoole & Mary Angell, was one of three emigrant brothers, who came to America in the 17th century. His 14 children are known, and he did not have a daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1687. In actual fact, James died in December 1686, with his will proved in Aug 1687. It would be almost impossible for him to have had a daughter born after his death (referring to the oft-quoted birth date for Elizabeth of 16 May 1687).

Further, some report that Elizabeth was born in London, England area; however, according to that date she was born after the arrival in America.

James did have a daughter named Elizabeth, his 14th child, born 25 May 1678, who died 31 May 1678.

James' emigrant brother, Norton, had a daughter named Elizabeth, born 16 May 1687, the likely source for this date. However, this Elizabeth also died in infancy.

The above is taken from "The Claypool(e) Family in America", by Evelyn Claypool Bracken, published in 1971. Certain of the above information in her book was taken from "The Compendium of American Genealogy, First Families in America, Vol. 7".

 
Family F231
 
625
CRITICAL #2:The book "Something of the Pettijohn (Pettijohn) Family, et. al. gives the following re person 5, William Pettyjohn:

"WILLIAM PETTYJOHN 3-2, born probably about 1691, either in Virginia, or in Sussex county, Del., and died at the latter place between Jan. 15, 1749, the date of his will, and Feb. 2, following, when it was probated. Tradition has it that he married Elizabeth Claypoole, born May 16, 1687. Their children: William 4-5-6; Esther 4-5-75; Agatha 4-5-76; Mary 4-5-77; Sarah 4-5; Levinah 4-5-78.""Something of the Pettijohn (Pettijohn) Family: with particular reference to the descendants of James Pettyjohn of Hungar's Parish, Northhampton County, Virginia" compiled by Era Jane Pettijohn Chamberlain of Buhl, Idaho, and Clive Abraham Pettijohn of Davenport, Washington, published in 1948.

Although this seems to correctly set the birth date of Elizabeth Claypoole at 16 May 1687, the following considerations are necessary:

The information given by Era Jane and Clive Abraham Pettijohn rely on earlier research, cited in their work: One such work, "Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines" (vol.2: Gates and Allied Families) by Rufus C. Dawes, published in 1931, mentions William Pettyjohn as marrying Elizabeth "possibly" Claypoole. No birth date or exact information is given for William's wife.

William is reported in "Something of the Pettijohn" as born either in Virginia or in Sussex County, Delaware in "probably 1691" and his marriage as "tradition has it" Elizabeth Claypoole. Regardless of whether William's wife's name was Elizabeth Claypoole, and regardless of whether that Elizabeth had a birth date of 16 May 1687 as reported here, it is pretty clear that this Elizabeth was not a daughter of James Claypoole, son of Sir John Claypoole & Mary Angell from England and living in Pennsylvania. When works cite information as "tradition", it means they are relying on former research or "often inaccurate" family records of their generation-by-generation gathered recollections which alone did not give clear information.
 
Family F231
 
626

Biographical Sketch of Alexander Walker (1765-1824)
~ and Indian encounter story ~
(Genealogy of the Descendants of John Walker of Wigton, Scotland, by Emma Siggins White. Published 1902 by Tiernan-Dart Publishing, Kansas City, KS. Index 2966, pg. 363.)
Note: This book is available free at archive.org


ALEXANDER Walker3 (1948) (Alexander2 John1); the eighth child of Alexander Walker and Jane Hummer (Hammer). He was b. July 12, 1765. He was twice married. His first wife was Mary Magdalene Harmon, whom he married on March 23, 1790. After her death he married Margaret (Peggy) Combs.

"I wish to relate one incident in relation to my grandfather, Alexander Walker, as I remember hearing my father, Allen H. Walker, relate it, when I was a boy. Sometime in 1790, grandfather wanted to go back to Virginia on business, and as there were no cars in those days, he was in no ways deterred from his purpose by the thought that the journey must be made, if at all, on foot. His preparations were simple. He parched some corn—this he placed in one end of a sack, in the other end he put a saddle of dried venison. After committing his wife and little ones to the care of the Allwise Father, he called his faithful dog and started on his long journey through the trackless forest, which at that time was infested with Indians. At night he would light a fire with the aid of his flint and punk ; after eating his supper he would clear away a warm place to sleep where his fire had been, being careful to put out all the fire, that it might not be the means of disclosing his whereabouts to the Indians. But one night he failed to extinguish all the fire, and was awakened by the growl of his dog. He saw a large Indian standing near, with a drawn tomahawk. He whispered to the dog, "catch him," and with one bound dog and Indian went out into the brush together. The faithful dog soon returned, but grandfather never looked to see what became of the Indian. I write this to show our children some of the perils their forefathers had to endure, before the comfortable homes of to-day were prepared for them.
T. G. WALKER, Macomb, Ill."
 
Walker, Alexander (I6681)
 
627

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Harmon Walker
(from findagrave.com - apparently appeared with his obituary)


Andrew Harmon Walker, deceased, was married March 20, 1834, to Jane Campbell, daughter of Alexander Campbell. Six children were born of this marriage--Margaret, Alexander C., Joseph Gilmer, Isabella, Cynthia, and a child which died in infancy. Mrs. Walker died October 29, 1845. January 31, 1850, Mr. Walker married Mrs. Mary Noel, who was a native of Virginia. By this marriage there were six children--William A., Cyrus A., Montgomery Allen, Martha J., Marion Alice, Ellen M. Mr. Walker during his lifetime was a prominent resident of the county, and after his death the following biographical sketch appeared in the Macomb Journal of January 22, 1885:

"Andrew Harmon Walker, the subject of this sketch, was born on the 16th day of August, 1808, near Columbia, Adair county, Kentucky. He had nine brothers and four sisters--all of whom are now dead except Quintus Walker, who is living in this county, Rev. Thomas Walker, who is living in Kansas, and Cynthia Campbell, also in Kansas. When three years old his mother died, and when he was about 16 years of age his father died. He was early destined by his father to be a lawyer, and to that end was given the best educational advantages that the state afforded. Although always opposed to a public life, in order to please his father and older brother, Cyrus, who was a member of the profession, he consented to prepare himself for the bar. He obtained his license, and made speeches, in which he gave promise of a brilliant and successful career, but, being always of a quiet and retiring disposition, he decided that a public life would not suit him. In 1830, he, in company with his younger brothers, sister and step-mother, left Kentucky and came to Sangamon county, and in the fall of 1831, they moved to Camp creek in this county. Andrew had, however, before this made several trips through McDonough, and had been in Macomb when it was first surveyed. In 1834 he was married to Jane Campbell, and in 1836, he moved to Walnut Grove township, where he remained until his death. He made a profession of religion when he was 29 years of age, but never united with a church, and those of his children and friends, who were with him in his last sickness, feel that they do not mourn as those who have no hope. His first two winters in Illinois were times of great privation--the first winter was that of the deep snow; the next, they being short of provisions on Camp creek, Andrew took a pack-horse and went back to Sangamon county for supplies. Before he started back the weather became very cold, but fearing the family would suffer, he started on his homeward journey. In crossing the river on the ice, when about the middle, the ice began to crack, and fearing it would break, left his horse and ran for the bank. Upon reaching safety, and looking back he saw his horse still standing in the middle of the river, and returning brought the animal across; and though impeded by snow, reached home safely, where he found the family in a destitute condition. He taught district school for a number of terms in McDonough county. Owing to his aversion to public life, he would never accept any office, unless there was no one else that could fill the place. He filled the office of school trustee for several years, and also that of school treasurer. He was in the Mormon war as a volunteer. His wife died October 28, 1845, and for several years he was father and mother both to his children. After several years he married Mrs. Mary Noel, who survives him. He was the father of 12 children. His first wife's children were Margaret Michaels, who died a few years ago in Missouri; A. C. Walker, who is living in Little River, Kansas; J. G. Walker, who is near Salisbury, Missouri; Isabella Scott, living in Walnut Grove township, this county; Cynthia Axtell, living in Kansas, and a child which died in infancy; his second wife's children were W. A. Walker, living in Baileyville, Kansas; C. A. and M. A. Walker, who live on the old homestead, and three who died in infancy. He was sick for some time before his death, and his disease was of a peculiar and trying nature. He suffered a great deal, but tried hard to be patient in all his afflictions. He died about five o'clock a. m., January 6, 1885. The funeral took place the next day, attended by a large concourse of friends and relatives. The sermon was preached by the Rev. H. J. Frothingham, of Bushnell. The remains were buried in the Pearce cemetery."



Biographical Sketch of Andrew Hammond Walker
(Genealogy of the Descendants of John Walker of Wigton, Scotland, by Emma Siggins White. Published 1902 by Tiernan-Dart Publishing, Kansas City, KS. Index 2966, pg. 403.)
Note: This book is available free at archive.org


ANDREW HAMMOND Walker4 (2966) (Alexander3, Alexander2, John1) ; b. Aug. 16, 1808, in Adair County, Ky. He attended school near home, studying Greek and Latin evenings at home by the light of pine knots, old fashioned fireplaces being commonly used then, and material for lights scarce. He attended a law school at Columbia, Ky., graduating in 1828, but never practiced. His father dying about this time, he, with his stepmother, brothers and sisters, moved to Illinois, settling in 1830 near Clara's Grove, Morgan County. He taught school for awhile, but a deep fall of snow prevented the children from attending, and the school had to be abandoned. The family moved in 1831 to Camp Creek, McDonough County. He m. March 20, 1834, Jane Campbell, making their home in Walnut Grove Township. The nearest church organization, which the family often attended was 10 miles northeast of Macomb, they having to travel all this distance on horseback. He was at one time County Superintendent of Schools, being well fitted for the position. His wife was b. May 8, 1812, and d. Oct. 29, 1845. After liis first wife died he m. Jan. 31, 1850, Mrs. Mary Noel (her maiden name being Hogsett). His second wife moved to California with her son, Cyrus Abner, in 1892, and they now live at Mt. Sterling, Cal. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church, Cyrus being a Methodist. Andrew Walker d. Jan. 6, 1885. He visited his cousin, Joel Walker (No. 1828), in 1856, and made a copy of the original Walker Record compiled by Joel Walker.
 
Walker, Andrew Hammond (I6628)
 
628
Abraham Workman and Annetje Smith, and their children and ancestors, often cited as being the parents of Joseph Workman (variously represented as born 1732-1736), have no documented son named Joseph.
Abraham's children have been researched carefully in Anderson (Workman Family History) and no son named Joseph, or John, or Isaac are mentioned, even though the oft-"estimated" birth years fit nicely into the 7-year gap in the child-bearing of Annetje with Abraham. Abraham's cousin, Isaac Workman, also descended from John William Workman/Woertman, but through Peter rather than Jans, did have three sons by these same names. Isaac's son, Joseph, is represented in Anderson's work as born in 1735 in Somerset Co., NJ, and her extensive research shows him as the Joseph who enlisted under Capt. Jackson and Capt. Stewart, drawn by her from original sources (noting that such Revolutionary War records do not always fully identify who is who). Therefore, our web site shows Joseph's father as Isaac and cites his lineage to John William.
 
Family F424
 
629
Abraham Workman and Annetje Smith, and their children and ancestors, often cited as being the parents of Joseph Workman (variously represented as born 1732-1736), have no documented son named Joseph.
Abraham's children have been researched carefully in Anderson (Workman Family History) and no son named Joseph, or John, or Isaac are mentioned, even though the oft-"estimated" birth years fit nicely into the 7-year gap in the child-bearing of Annetje with Abraham. Abraham's cousin, Isaac Workman, also descended from John William Workman/Woertman, but through Peter rather than Jans, did have three sons by these same names. Isaac's son, Joseph, is represented in Anderson's work as born in 1735 in Somerset Co., NJ, and her extensive research shows him as the Joseph who enlisted under Capt. Jackson and Capt. Stewart, drawn by her from original sources (noting that such Revolutionary War records do not always fully identify who is who). Therefore, our web site shows Joseph's father as Isaac and cites his lineage to John William.
 
Family F422
 
630
BEWARE: Please note that the records given here may or may not accurately be parental information for John Siner/Sinah, Sr., the Revolutionary War soldier. Records from databases associated with the LDS church such as found on ancestry.com and familysearch.org, are often compilations of data submitted by members. With the advent of the Internet, such databases have become less and less reliable while becoming more and more available.

Additionally, as an example, the book excerpt from the Parish Register of Christ Church in Middlesex County, Virginia, published in 1897 gives but scanty information using a spelling of the Sinor name other than Sinor. Supporting the spelling given there are the Revolutioinary War military service records of John Sinah; whose name also appears in those records occasionally as John Siner (in the same regiment and company with the same soldiers as peers).

To date, I haven't seen any solid documentation that Mary, wife of Joseph Sinah, was the widow of a Mr. Small. The record image shown here, offering Joseph Sineth married to Mary Small is an LDS-related databse record, existing primarily because this information was submitted by someone.

Other LDS-related database records give Joseph as being born 19 Aug 1718 as a son of John Senar in Wragby, Metropolitan Borough of Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England. The same database gives a John Senar born in York in 1640. Although possible, it is unlikely that John Senar at age 78, had a son Joseph. The database record for John Senar gives William Senar as his father. Again, the same database records give a William Senar born in 1635, obviously not the father of John. If there is a relationship at all, it would be that John and William are brothers rather than parent and child, with neither of them being a parent of Joseph.

View Unreliable Images Side-By-Side     (best viewed with browser maximized)
 
Family F741
 
631 "History and Genealogy of the Page Family..." gives John's second wife as Abigail Scribner. However, the Norwalk Vital Records 1651-1850 NASH section of "Connecticut Town Birth Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection)" shows "John m. Abigail PERSONS, (2nd w.), Nov. 4, 1758". This marriage date fits perfectly between the death of his first wife, Sarah, and the births of the children of his second wife. Therefore Persons is used as her surname; which could be her maiden name or a surname from a previous marriage. Persons, Abigail (I14791)
 
632 (Frank's marriage to Mary was his second marriage.) Bell, Frank (I16220)
 
633 (license issue date: 17 Dec 1891) Family F1382
 
634 (Oak Hill Cemetery, Oak Hill Graveyard) Teel, John Franklin (I13656)
 
635 (Oak Hill Cemetery, Oak Hill Graveyard) Martin, Agnes Roseanne (I13657)
 
636 (record shows Jan 19th, but is probably when recorded) Family F1391
 
637 A Brief Biographical Sketch of John Edward Proctor and his extended family

John Edward Proctor was born February 10, 1752 in Stafford County, Virginia. What he did as a youngster and what his parents names were are unknown at this time. It has been suggested his mother remarried to a man whose name was Edward Riley and for some years they made their home in Fauquier County, Virginia.

In the year 1777 he went to the Fauquier County courthouse and enlisted in the militia. He served 3 to 5 years and was supposedly at The Battle of Brandywine, Battle of the Cowpens, and The Siege of Yorktown. He was discharged and came back to Fauquier County and in that same county on December 21, 1786, he married Elizabeth Hudnall, the daughter of Joseph Hudnall and Mary Ann Taylor. How often the family moved around during the next twenty years is unknown but it is rumoured that John had traveled to Mayesville, Mason County, Kentucky with his brother-in-law Benjamin Hudnall as Tennant Farmers. What I do know is that by 1810 they seem to have made a permanent home in Kanawha County (W.)Va. When the family first arrived in Kanawha they lived somewhere on Paint Creek, later John bought some land from William Morris on Kelly's Creek (which is located in Cedar Grove, WV) and in 1828 he received more of the same land from the Govenor by way of a land grant. Their neighbors included the Morris family and the Hansford Family. They attended the first church in the area, which was established in 1786 by the Elder James Johnson and was called Kanawha Baptist Church. John had lost his oldest son William around 1830, so he went to live with his son John, who in 1816 had relocated to Randolph County, Indiana. Around the time of his relocation to Indiana, the war department was looking for soldiers whose records were destroyed by fire in 1812. In 1833, Elizabeth was still living and where she died may always be a mystery. John stayed for a couple years in Indiana before setting of on the rest of his journey. From Indiana he traveled through Illinois, Arkansas, and to Bowie County, Texas with his son Nathan. In 1851 John Edward Jr. went west for a herd and to bring his aging father with him back to what was then and now called Elkhart County, Indiana. Upon his return to Indiana, he proceeded to try to claim his pension and was denied it for lack of proof. He died in Elkhart County, Indiana at the home of his son on January 11, 1856 and was buried in the Heaton Family Cemetery, now named the John Proctor Cemetery. John and Elizabeth's children were; William Proctor was born 1787 Fauquier County Va. He married Anna Martin September 14, 1806 in Kanawha County, (W)Va. And died c1830 in Kanawha County, (W)Va. What became of his children is unknown at this time but it is assumed they went to Indiana to live with their Uncle John.

John Proctor was born 1791 and died in Elkhart County, Indiana. He married Rebecca Spangler in Kanawha County, (W)Va in the year 1813. John and Rebecca left Kanawha County in 1816 to move to Indiana. Frances Proctor was born c1788 and married Joseph Hughes, both Frances and her husband Joseph were dead in 1850, it is not known where they died. Reuben Proctor was born 1799 and married Jane Hudnall, Jane was the daughter of Benjamin Hudnall and Nancy Riley. Reuben and Jane remained in Kanawha County. Tyler Proctor was born 1798 in Kanawha County and died c1853 in that same county. Tyler married Mary Hudnall, also a daughter of Benjamin Hudnall and Nancy Riley c1823. Tyler and Mary remained in Kanawha County. Mary died after 1870 and is found selling her Dowager rights from the land on Paint Creek to Aaron Stockton. Nathan Proctor was born 1796 and married Sarah /unknown/. Nathan and Sarah moved to Bowie County, Texas. There is a Mayberry Proctor born c1810, it is not known whether he belonged to John Proctor Senior or to his son William.

The WVGenWeb Project Kanawha County Biography Library

 
Family F27435
 
638  of Sweden, Ingegerd Olofsdotter (I8237)
 
639  Cromartie, Duncan (I1078)
 
640
 
Owain Gwynedd ap Gruffydd (I6952)
 
641  of Holland, Bertha (I8236)
 
642 Although not shown in this database, the available Barker line continues back into the 12th century. Barker, Ann Sarah (I13806)
 
643 Although not shown in this database, the available Peckham line continues back into the 15th century. Peckham, Philip (I13820)
 
644 Below is an excerpt from Part I, Chapter One, Genealogy of Jacob Miller and his Descendants (With Some Brief History Thereto), by Everett W. Miller, 1953. Note that local records were destroyed by fire, and existing records came from other sources, including records in Washington, D.C.
Note that this work is a compilation of records, recollections and other previous works.


"According to Government records obtained by Sigfus Olafson, Jacob Miller was born in Germany in the year 1702 and came to America with his parents in 1715. They settled about 30 miles from the Port of Philadelphia, at a place known as Faulkner's Swamp. Here Jacob, the boy, lived to manhood and at the age of 23 married a German girl of the same name, who either came over with them, or at a later date; more probably at a later date, since she was from another part of Germany and spoke a different dialect. One spoke High German, being from the Highlands, while the other spoke Low German, being from the Lowlands.

"Philadelphia being the port to which most of the early emigrants came, the nearby territory soon became thickly populated. Consequently they spread outward into the less settled parts of the surrounding country-Westward into the Pennsylvania Territory; South and Southwestward into the Virginia Territory.

JACOB MILLER and family went south westward along the southern fringe of the Allegheny Mountains and found their way into the Shenandoah Valley, making their home in the fertile valley of (now) Rockingham County, near the present town of Harrisonburg, where be reared his family."
 
Miller, Jacob Sr. (I10605)
 
645 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Pitman, Isaac (I7112)
 
646 CAUTION! This Ann Doane without data may be an error, as a spouse of William Jr's father (William Twining, Sr.) was Ann Doane...and family linking is unclear in his father's relationships/unions as well. Family F5082
 
647 John Degan was formerly listed as a spouse of Sarah A. (Compton), but there is no solid evidence of that relationship and the link has been removed. Hodges, Sarah A. (I4540)
 
648 Several problems exist with Isaac as parent of Jonathan Pitman, even though the SAR & DAR accepted that information when submitted. Basically, there is no known original record reference supporting the connection between these two men. Compilations of collected tidbits of information, assembled to look official for the purpose intended (sometimes for a book), do not take some things into account, and make assumptions about relationships, sometimes even stating that they've done so...which is true of the DAR documentation. For instance, the DAR record states it is assuming certain people are Jonathan's sons, and yet his will does not include them and there are no records indicating these relationships (specifically Simon, Pierson, Daniel and David). These could be sons, but could as easily not be sons. Family F172
 
649 The entire lineage of descendants of Nicholas Workman/Woertman is intentionally unlinked/orphaned from the main family tree structure.

Many family trees list variations connecting John William Workman/Woertman to Nicholas through his son, Thomas. However, Nicholas's descendants migrated to America from England. John William's descendants migrated to America from Holland. Even though immigration from Holland and England were often together on the same ship, I have no evidence that John William was son of Thomas, son of Nicholas.

Further, the family of Agnes Hale was formerly linked to Thomas Workman/Woertman, son of Nicholas. I have no proof that this family was related to Thomas. However, Thomas's will probated in 1579 (per extensive research by Anderson [Workman Family History]), making it clear that many of these children could not be his by any spouse. Formerly, John William Workman/Woertman was included here as one of Agnes's children. I have unlinked him from this family as there is no proof of that union being from Thomas, son of Nicholas.

John William Workman/Woertman is not listed in the initial two sections of Anderson; however, he is given in the following sections as a key figure preceding the emigration of his descendants to America. These later sections are not a genealogy of descendants of Nicholas, but are descendants of John William himself...and no parents for John William are given in Anderson sections available. In that work and section, he is designated as 1H, a code used to identify the first of a family migrating from Holland to America. Nicholas and his descendants migrated from England.

Therefore 1)John William is unlinked from Nicholas's son, Thomas; 2)John William is now given as the oldest ancestor in our Workman lineage until his parents' information and documentation is found. Our lineage goes from Susannah Workman, wife of Capt. James Harvey Sperry back through time to John William Workman/Woertman. 
Workman, Nicholas (I13618)
 
650 This family is intentionally unlinked/orphaned from the main family tree structure.

The family of Agnes Hale was formerly linked to Thomas Workman/Woertman, son of Nicholas. I have no proof that this family was related to Thomas. However, Thomas's will probated in 1579 (per extensive research by Anderson [Workman Family History]), making it clear that many of these children could not be his by any spouse. Formerly, John William Workman/Woertman was included here as one of Agnes's children. I have unlinked him from this family as there is no proof of that union being from Thomas, son of Nicholas.

John William Workman/Woertman (previously represented as a son of Thomas, son of Nicholas) is not listed in the initial two sections of Anderson; however, he is given in the following sections as a key figure preceding the emigration of his descendants to America. These later sections are not a genealogy of descendants of Nicholas, but are descendants of John William himself...and no parents for John William are given in Anderson sections available. In that work and section, he is designated as 1H, a code used to identify the first of a family migrating from Holland to America. Nicholas and his descendants migrated from England.

Therefore 1)John William is unlinked from Nicholas's son, Thomas; 2)John William is now given as the oldest ancestor in our Workman lineage until his parents' information and documentation is found. Our lineage goes from Susannah Workman, wife of Capt. James Harvey Sperry back through time to John William Workman/Woertman. 
Family F433
 
651 This John Degan, his wife, Sarah, and their son, Alex, were formerly linked to Sarah A. (wife of Francis Compton)...as another spouse of Sarah A. This was an assumption. Thus this linking has been removed, and this family is intentionally left orphaned from the main tree...and is kept only for reference in case a connection that makes sense is found. It was a futile attempt to account for where Ora Ella Scaggs was during the 1880 census, when her siblings are with their grandmother, Sarah A. (Compton). Ella was about 14 at that time, and her whereabouts for that period are unknown. Degan, John Sr. (I4597)
 
652 THIS NASH FAMILY INTENTIONALLY ORPHANED FROM MAIN LINES & UNLINKED FROM AARON J. NASH, SR., as this Aaron is not him. May delete this entire line later, but saving for reference because of locations and they may fit in later. - (orphaned 12 Feb 2019) For references, see: findagrave: https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/117104529/person/390160908029/facts?_phsrc=QBc1662&_phstart=successSource and other references with Aaron 1783-1835.  Family F790
 
653 Various notes, censuses, estimated birth years, lists of children do not agree. Both Martha and Lenora are cited as the mother of Thomas Young Lee. Lenora as mother is supported by the 1880 census, if indeed this William H. Lee is the correct parent for Thomas. There are MANY notes and Bible records yet to be compared. Therefore posting of various census and information is halted temporarily, and changes may be forthcoming. Lee, William Henry (I6097)
 
654 Various notes, censuses, estimated birth years, lists of children do not agree. Both Martha and Lenora are cited as the mother of Thomas Young Lee. Lenora as mother is supported by the 1880 census, if indeed this William H. Lee is the correct parent for Thomas. There are MANY notes and Bible records yet to be compared. Therefore posting of various census and information is halted temporarily, and changes may be forthcoming. Lee, William Henry (I6097)
 
655 Excerpt from "Workman Family History"
by Thelma Chidester Anderson, Publishers Press, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1962 p.29:

2. ISAAC WORKMAN, number 81H above, son of Peter Derick Woertman 16H (Dirck Jan 13H John William 1H) and born 1710 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York; married about 1733; with his wife, FEMMETJE (PHOEBE) RAGEL, witnessed the christening of Isaac, son of Lucas Covert and Harmptje (Hermitien) Woertman 41H. The couple moved from New York to Somerville, Somerset Co., New Jersey, where their children seem to have been born.

Just what Isaac's military service was during the Revolution has not been determined but when the military land in Maryland was apportioned he was granted title to fifty acres of land, military lot No. 3656, in Fort Cumberland, at the April session of the Assembly of 1784. Ten years later, on the 14 day of April 1794, Isaac transferred the title of this land to his son, Isaac Jr. Whether or not Isaac Sr. ever actually lived on the land in Maryland is questionable.

The children of Isaac and Femmetje, so far as known, were:

10. SARAH WORKMAN born about 1734; known to be in Maryland later; married NATHAN COMPTON.
11. JOSEPH WORKMAN born 1735 in Somerset Co., New Jersey; appears in the list of recruits raised by Capt. Paul Jackson for the Pennsylvania Regiment, 2 June 1758: "Joseph Workman, laborer, 5 feet 8 inches tall, Of Chester Co., Pa., enlisted 6 May 1756 aged 21, born in New Jersey; Of thin visage." (See Pennsylvania Archives) . He is also listed with the men who returned in Capt. Charles Stewart's Co., 5 June 1759, having enlisted this time 22 May 1759, age 24, from Pennsylvania. He participated in the Revolution, enlisted 28 Aug. 1776 and is believed to be the progenitor of the family that settled Boone Co., West Virginia, inasmuch as he did not receive military land in Maryland. (See later chapter.)
12. FANNIE WORKMAN chr 11 April 1736. May have died young.
13. STEPHEN WORKMAN born 1738 in New Jersey. Served in the Revolution.
14. JOHN WORKMAN born 1740; probably the John who served in the Revolution.
*15. ISAAC WORKMAN born 1742 in New Jersey; died 1827 in Danville, Knox, Ohio.
16. REBECCA WORKMAN, known to have lived in Maryland.,
17. NANCY WORKMAN, known to have lived in Maryland.
 
Workman, Joseph (I13557)
 
656 "The Doane Family" states Elisha Doane, son of Hezekiah Doane, Jr., was "probably lost at sea about 1784". It further states "His widow, Hannah [Green] Doane of Cambridge, was appointed to settle his small estate early in 1784", placing his death in late 1783 or early 1784. DOANE, Elisha (I2180)
 
657 Dominus Humfredus de Bohun, cum barba, qui prius venit cum Willielmo Conquestore in Angliam de Normannia, cognatus dicti Conquestoris... ("Lord Humphrey de Bohun, with the beard, who first came with William the Conqueror to England from Normandy, a relative of the said Conqueror"). – Humphrey being called "with a beard" was first recorded in a chronicle of Llanthony Prima, edited by William Dugdale in the Monasticono Anglicanum (VI. 134) de Bohun, Humphrey "with a Beard" (I7210)
 
658  Rev. Gilbert B. Pauley  was born Gilbie Burnett Pauley. Gilbey was not a nickname and he used it throughout his life. Pauley, Gilbie Burnette (I1998)
 
659 "Early Land Acquisition in Virginia" - P687: Joseph Claypool of Hampshire County, 174 acres in the Cove in Forks of Cow Run Branch of Lost River in said Co. Surv'd 3 Dec. 1754 for John Dunbar by John Mauzy and forfeited & recorded in Book N. Deed to Joseph Claypool assignee of John Dunbar. 21 Nov. 1771. [Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775, Vol. 2, Gertrude E. Gray, pg. 214]. Claypoole, Joseph (I7506)
 
660 "Records in Augusta County, VA" - Page 79.--19th August, 1761. Mary Jackson's (late Mary Claypole) settlement of estate of William Claypole recorded--To Jno. Wright, Francis McBride, Jno. Dunbar, Jno. and Jos. Claypole, Mr. Johns, Evan Thomas. Sale bill, viz: To Robert Williams, Jersmons Peir, Arthur Trader, Moses Samples, John Douglass, Jno. Arshers, James Cohoon, Dennis Henry, Wm. Cimsey, Andw. Sedusky, Rees Thomas, Henry Harvey. (Note: William Claypool was Joseph's brother). Claypoole, Joseph (I7506)
 
661 "Records in Augusta County, VA" - Vol. 1 - AUGUST, 1789 (A to G). - Andrew Donnolly, of Greenbrier, vs. Hugh Millar.--In October, 1785, the General Assembly appropriated funds to build a road from eastern to western waters and defendant became contractor and plaintiff was his partner. The road was from Greenbrier C. H. to the Kenoway. The people themselves divided the whole county into thirteen districts, and each district elected a parson to form a committee to superintend the business. The committee appointed Hugh Millar foreman to undertake on behalf of the people and went security in the bond for his performance and took bond of him with condition that equal justice might be done to all. The committee divided the road into thirteen parts, that each individual might work out the tax he was in arrears. At the dividing, Colonel Donnelly told the committee he owed the treasury £170 of taxes due for 1782 as sheriff, and that he thought himself included in the law. Committee refused to grant a certificate to Donnelly because he did not make it appear that he was in the law, etc. (a full account of the transactions). At a meeting of the committee of the inhabitants of the county of Greenbrier, held 30th September, 1786, Hugh Miller, William Renick, John Anderson, James Graham, William Morris, William Johnston, Alexander Welch, Thomas Wright, Samuel Williams, Joseph Claypool, John Hutcheson, Hugh Capertin, and Archibald Hauley; Resolved, (Colonel Donnally assigned a district from Capt. Morris district on Bell Creek to 67th mile tree on Rich Creek). A copy. Teste. W. H. Cavendish, Clerk of Committee. Know all men, etc., I, Hugh Millar, of county of Greenbrier, etc., bound to John Anderson, James Graham, William Morris, Hugh Capertin, William Renick, Archibald Hauley, Joseph Claypool, John Hutcheson, Samuel Williams, Thomas Wright, William McCoy, John Byrnside, John Stuart for Alexander McCoy, William Johnston in £10,000, 25th May, 1786. Condition to do justice to all the inhabitants as foreman in the prosecution of the work. Claypoole, Joseph (I7506)
 
662 7 Jun 1892

"[Homer] Plessy bought a first-class ticket on a train from New Orleans and sat in the car for white riders only. The [Citizens' Committee of New Orleans] had hired a private detective with arrest powers to take Plessy off the train at Press and Royal streets, to ensure that he was charged with violating the state's separate-car law and not some other misdemeanor."

Note: "The Committee...recruited Plessy to deliberately violate Louisiana's 1890 separate-car law. To pose a clear test, the Citizens' Committee gave notice of Plessy's intent to the railroad, which opposed the law because it required adding more cars to its trains."

On appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, the decision went against Plessy, resulting in "separate but equal" discrimination by states. This was at a time when Louisiana was being occupied by federal troops due to the American Civil War and Reconstruction; which had liberated blacks. Withdrawal of federal troops effectively reversed some of the freedoms granted.

The "Separate but Equal" ruling was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1954.

10 Feb 2009

The Plessy & Ferguson Foundation of New Orleans placed a historical marker at the corner of Press and Royal streets, where the arrest had taken place some 117 years earlier.

Historical Marker Photos By Skywriter - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0


FRONT


BACK


Above adapted from the Wikipedia article
Plessy, Homer (I6447)
 
663 Sinor, Siner, Sinah & other spellings, sometimes used by the same person, or those attempting to record their name. Siner, John Sr. (I14728)
 
664 * Loretta was adopted as an infant. See Octave Adkins for information on her natural parents, ancestors and siblings. Pittman, Loretta Eileen (I12665)
 
665 Andrew Jackson Adkins' place of death:
VIEW BURIAL SITE INFORMATION
 
Atkins, Andrew Jackson (I21)
 
666 A HISTORY OF THE 1793 CORNERSTONE LAYING

Our tale is complex. It comes in part from well-established historical sources and in part from the oral history of the McCauley family to which one of us (KBN) belongs. The first question is, "Why was the University placed at New Hope Chapel Hll?

One version is related to General William R. Davie's drinking habits. It has been said that, while having lunch in the vicinity of the Davie Poplar, he was overcome and made the decision to locate the University there when he aroused. The truth is more prosaic: it was the outcome of a complicated political process. The General Assembly decided in January 1792 that the University should be located near the center of the state. The trustees then decided that it should be located within 15 miles of either Raleigh, Hillsborough, Pittsboro, Smithfield, two sites in Granville County, or Cyprett's Bridge across New Hope Creek. The latter was chosen when all the courthouse towns were eliminated and the Granville County sites found unsuitable. A committee visited several potential sites in the target area, and Chapel Hill was selected because its bid was the largest: 1290 acres of land and about $1500 in cash! Professor Archibald Henderson attributes the winning Orange County bid to the covert activities of James Hogg, a friend of Davie's and a member of the selection committee. Now, who were the McCauleys and what role did they play?

Matthew McCauley and his brother William emigrated from County Antrim, Northern Ireland, to the Carolinas before the Revolutionary War. They bought land in Orange County so named to honor the Protestants of Northern Ireland and prospered. Matthew, the younger, had been involved in a scrape in Ireland and had to be smuggled out of the country in a molasses cask. He acquired the nickname "Bung" because William had fed him through the bung-hole of the cask until they were well out to sea.

Both McCauleys donated land for the University, Matthew 150 and William 100 acres. Matthew ("Bung") operated a grist mill on Morgan's Creek at the site of the present University Lake dam and was reputed to make the best Irish whiskey in the state. Both were present at the laying of the cornerstone of Old East on October 12, 1792 (known since 1877 as University Day). Several things happened that day which are not recorded in the history books, and Matthew was a major player behind the scenes.

Cornerstone laying was serious business in an earlier age when buildings were constructed for permanence but is ignored today in our rapidly constructed, disposable buildings. Because of the absence of a royal family in republican America, the ceremony of laying cornerstones became the responsibility of Freemasons.

Freemasonry is a secret order which grew out of the guilds of stone masons which built the cathedrals of Europe in the Middle Ages. It has been most prominent in the United Kingdom and the countries derived therefrom: Australia, and four million of the estimated five million living members are in the U.S. Masonry is characterized by secrecy, a tradition of high morality, and catholicity. It is not a religion and, although predominantly Protestant in Anglo-Saxon countries, does not exclude Catholics and Jews. It is not a patriotic or political organization, but American politicians have found identification with it to be advantageous. There is a parallel and independent black Masonic society, the Order of Prince William, which originated in London during the slavery era and still flourishes.

The McCauleys were Master Masons and belonged to the Eagle Lodge of Hillsborough which had been asked to provide support at the laying of Old East's cornerstone. Since General William R. Davie, regarded by many as the founder of the University, was also the Grand Master of Masons for North Carolina it was fitting that he officiate. A mural on the west wall of the lobby of the downtown Chapel Hill Post office records what is believed to have occurred. History suggests that something slightly different seems to have taken place.

General Davie came up to Hillsborough from New Bern for the occasion and "opened" the Eagle Lodge to legitimize the laying of the cornerstone. Details of the occasion can he found in the University histories of President Battle and Professor Archibald Henderson, Battle even recording the names of the prominent men in attendance and the accomplishments of their descendants. At this point oral history takes over.

A legend in the McCauley family is that the Post Office mural is incorrect in two respects. First, General Davie should have been wearing a hat. (Masons will understand why.) Second, the stone was not lowered into place by a hoist and windlass. The family says that the stone was heavier than anticipated, and the hoist rope broke. When this occurred, "Bung" McCauley, a small man, turned to Big Dave, his body servant, a 6'5" slave who weighed 300 lbs., and said, "Dave, pick it up and put it in place." The story is that Dave put his arms around the stone and lifted it onto the spot designated by General Davie. Then, after a suitable oration by the Rev. Dr. Samuel E. McCorkle and the sealing of documents and Masonic "jewels" in the cavity of the cornerstone, the party repaired to a nearby spring for refreshments.

Another McCauley legend is that "Bung" furnished the chief "refreshment." It is said that earlier in the day Dave had placed a 25-gallon keg of their best whiskey in their cart, and this became the centerpiece of the post-ceremony conviviality. General Davie was a heavy drinker, and the cup made many rounds. As nightfall approached, the well-oiled General said his goodbyes, and departed for New Bern. Unfortunately, the Masonic Grand Master had forgotten before departing to "close" the Eagle Lodge. It remained "open" until the Grand Master's next visit, more than a year later. It is said that by lying open for more than a year, the Eagle Lodge of Hillsborough achieved a distinction unique in Masonic history.

We decided to investigate the present state of the cornerstone in view of the upcoming Bicentennial celebrations. To our astonishment, we were unable to find it. We then discovered that Old East's cornerstone had been vandalized and its brass plate stolen. This must have occurred sometime between the end of the Civil War and the re-opening by new trustees after the post Civil War closure (1871-75). It is known that cornerstones were also laid for Old West and South (and probably for Person), but our search uncovered none of these.

Our hypothesis about the mysterious cornerstone caper is that a band of vandals attacked the empty and unprotected buildings in search of the Masonic "jewels" known to have been placed in the cornerstone. We can infer that they were not themselves Masons for two reasons: (l) a Mason would never do such a thing, and (2) a Mason would know that the so-called "jewels" were in reality only the simple tools of stone masons.

"The brass plate from the Old East cornerstone turned up in 1916 at a foundry in Tennessee run by a UNC alumnus, William Foust '03. He returned the plate just before it was to be tossed into the furnace, and presented it to the University on October 12, 1916. Today the brass plate, with the maker's name and Masonic writing and symbols on the back, is on display in the gallery of Wilson Library.- Alumni Review""

Written by John Graham, Distinguished Professor-Emeritus of Pathology; and Kemp Nye, Franklin Street fixture and former proprietor of Kemp's Records for the Carolina Alumni Review, published by the General Alumni Association of UNC/CH, April, 1990. Reprinted by permission (on www.grandlodge-nc.org).

 
Family F7911
 
667 DISAMBIGUATION RE JAMES M. SKAGGS, father of Ora Ella Skaggs

James Miner Skaggs,
born about 1839, (also officially used the name Miner Skaggs) was mistakenly named as spouse of Elizabeth Compton with a name of James Minor Skaggs, and displayed as such on this site for a long time. This connection has been disproven.
--James Miner Skaggs enlisted with the Union for the Civil War 19 Aug 1861 and served in Company K, 25th Regiment, Indiana Infantry (note his gravestone...went in as a Private, and was a Private when he died. He died of measles in the line of duty on either 23 or 27 Oct 1861 (official war records give both dates). Documents accompanying the pension application verify his service and his death.
--He was originally buried in the Civil War Cemetery at Otterville, Missouri, and later reinterred at Jefferson City National Cemetery, in St. Louis, Missouri.
--His parents were Thomas T. Skaggs & Barbara Ellen Rose. I've found no record of his ever being married or having children.

James Monroe Skaggs (of Kentucky) has at times been suggested as Ella's father.
--He was (reportedly) the son of Thomas Davis Skaggs & Jamima Jane Williams and married Mary Agnes Morrison, having five children with her (not Ella or her known siblings).
--He was reported as buried at Rock Creek Church Cemetery, Rock Creek, Grayson County, Kentucky.

James M. Skaggs, born about 1839, listed in the 1870 U.S. Census of Rochester Mills, Coffee Precinct, Wabash County, Illinois, shows him with wife Elizabeth and four children: Polly, Ella, Lena and Thomas W.
--The record of his daughter, Lena's application for a pension for herself and siblings as his dependents (i.e.-Skaggs, Lena et al), lists his (Civil War) service with the Union as with Company B, 63rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry. He survived the war and lived until 1878, having children born to him by Elizabeth as late as 1874.
--The application for a headstone (applied for later on related to his military burial) verifies his service and shows he was buried in Rochester Cemetery, Keensburg, Illinois.
--The Illinois Statewide Marriage Index (Vol.197,pg.9) shows SKAGGS, JAMES M. married to COMPTON, ELIZABETH on 1861-10-31, Wabash County, Illinois, just days before James Miner Skaggs died during the war.
--The Illinois Statewide Death Index (Vol.1,pg.7,Cert.89) shows SKAGGS, JAMES M. as having died 1878-05-25 in Rochester, Wabash County at the age of 42 (indicating his birth approximation from census records may be off a few years).
 
Skaggs, James Miner (I4533)
 
668 DISAMBIGUATION RE JAMES M. SKAGGS, father of Ora Ella Skaggs

James Miner Skaggs,
born about 1839, (also officially used the name Miner Skaggs) was mistakenly named as spouse of Elizabeth Compton with a name of James Minor Skaggs, and displayed as such on this site for a long time. This connection has been disproven.
--James Miner Skaggs enlisted with the Union for the Civil War 19 Aug 1861 and served in Company K, 25th Regiment, Indiana Infantry (note his gravestone...went in as a Private, and was a Private when he died. He died of measles in the line of duty on either 23 or 27 Oct 1861 (official war records give both dates). Documents accompanying the pension application verify his service and his death.
--He was originally buried in the Civil War Cemetery at Otterville, Missouri, and later reinterred at Jefferson City National Cemetery, in St. Louis, Missouri.
--His parents were Thomas T. Skaggs & Barbara Ellen Rose. I've found no record of his ever being married or having children.

James Monroe Skaggs (of Kentucky) has at times been suggested as Ella's father.
--He was (reportedly) the son of Thomas Davis Skaggs & Jamima Jane Williams and married Mary Agnes Morrison, having five children with her (not Ella or her known siblings).
--He was reported as buried at Rock Creek Church Cemetery, Rock Creek, Grayson County, Kentucky.

James M. Skaggs, born about 1839, listed in the 1870 U.S. Census of Rochester Mills, Coffee Precinct, Wabash County, Illinois, shows him with wife Elizabeth and four children: Polly, Ella, Lena and Thomas W.
--The record of his daughter, Lena's application for a pension for herself and siblings as his dependents (i.e.-Skaggs, Lena et al), lists his (Civil War) service with the Union as with Company B, 63rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry. He survived the war and lived until 1878, having children born to him by Elizabeth as late as 1874.
--The application for a headstone (applied for later on related to his military burial) verifies his service and shows he was buried in Rochester Cemetery, Keensburg, Illinois.
--The Illinois Statewide Marriage Index (Vol.197,pg.9) shows SKAGGS, JAMES M. married to COMPTON, ELIZABETH on 1861-10-31, Wabash County, Illinois, just days before James Miner Skaggs died during the war.
--The Illinois Statewide Death Index (Vol.1,pg.7,Cert.89) shows SKAGGS, JAMES M. as having died 1878-05-25 in Rochester, Wabash County at the age of 42 (indicating his birth approximation from census records may be off a few years).
 
Skaggs, James M. (I12912)
 
669 Fact 1 - Jacob's death record gives his birth date as February 29, 1858.
Fact 2 - His birth year and age indicated in censuses is 1859.
Fact 3 - His birth record gives January 31 with no year indicated on the page.
People transcribing from the 17-page set of records identified as 1857 have understandably believed that this January date was in 1857. However, "1857" appears only on the first six pages of that set. At the bottom of page 6, the county clerk signs off on the "foregoing", dated 29 June 1858. This must indicate that the "following" pages would be 1858 or later. Jacob's January birth listed after the clerk signing off would be in 1859. Apparently, Jacob believed he was born in February; however, this may have come from a record of a baptism or christening.

1900 Census:
 
Sperry, Jacob W. (I13472)
 
670 McCauley Mill

This mill was where University Lake Dam was built in the 1920's on Morgan Creek in Carrboro. Battle's History of UNC (1907) says: "Thomas Connelly was once owner of the Matthew Mccauley mill tract." But there is no evidence that Connelly ever built a mill there. The first mill on this site was probably built shortly after Matthew Mccauley petitioned the Orange Court for a mill in 1793 (Archives).

Apparently some time about 1860, Matthew J W Mccauley struck up a deal with millwright Berry Davidson to rebuild or improve the family millsite. Davidson thereby gained an interest in the mill for sometime. Davidson apparently raised the height of the dam to 13 feet and thereby flooded some of James Tilly's land (Orange DB 38, pg 218). Davidson relinquished his interest to Mccauley in 1866 (Orange DB 38, pg 219) for $1,500.

Above from www.hawrivermills.pbworks.co/Mccauley-Mill

Related: Berry Davidson was a millwright who built several mills in Orange and Alamance Counties. He was definitely involved in the Mccauley Mill and was the owner of the Altamahaw Mill.

 
Family F7911
 
671 October 12, 1882 Marriage Record of William H. Horton & Octavy (Egnor) Smith shows Octavia as 22 years old, setting her birth year at approximately 1860.

-- born 1856/1860 VA per Gould family records

-- born abt 1856 VA per 1870 census

-- born abt 1861 per 1880 census

-- born June 1856 per 1900 census (listed previously as 1862, but a clearer image shows 1856) 
Egnor, Octavia (I4552)
 
672 Original Letter July 8, 1882 from Darius to Maj. Gen. Wm. B. Franklin with Darius' signature is for sale at HistoryForSale.com image: 177241.jpg (as of July 28, 2010) COUCH, MajGen. Darius Nash (I3189)
 
673 Remembrance by Doug Couch...
I was fortunate enough to be Pat's son-in-law. He and I did not talk often, but I remember him and the love he shared with me. A quiet man, he worked while I knew him as a building inspector. Many games of 2-deck Canasta were enjoyed with Pat and his wife, Bea, partnered against his daughter, Linda, and future son-in-law, myself. Sometimes these were played (interspersed with bowls of chocolate ice cream) after I'd hitchhiked from my parents' place in Riverside, courting his daughter, then hitchhiked home.

After Linda and I were married, he took me to my only real ball game by a pro team at the Angels Stadium in Anaheim. At least once, he took me to fish off the pier in Huntington Beach. We never caught anything, but I came to understand that I was treasured.

I loved him, although I'm not so sure I ever showed it as he showed to me. He was a good role model of a husband, father, father-in-law and grandfather to his granddaughter, Lisa, and I know his family miss him dearly to this day, even though I have not seen any of them for many years. I was in poor shape during that period of my life and did not treat Linda or Lisa well, and yet never a cross word came from him. I'm sorry, Pat, and hope your later son-in-law, Jim, filled their lives and yours with joy.

You're never forgotten. Perhaps a day will come when I will discover where you were buried and visit there. For now, let these few tears of loving remembrance suffice, remembering when I was able to come to your home and have you as part of my life.
 
Walker, Gilmer Lee (I483)
 
674

ARTIST: Etching in Metals 
Fuentes, Pedro (I9112)
 
675
DIXIE KIDD - Obituary

Dixie "Mommy D" Kidd, 78, of Alum Creek, went home to the Lord peacefully Friday October 5, 2012 after a long illness.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Hurshel (Hurk) Kidd; father and mother, Andrew and Susan Purdue Turley; brother, Toy Turley and sister, Louise Elkins.

She was a homemaker, a giver of love, and a member of the Alum Creek Church of Christ.

She is survived by her son, Todd (Tammy) Wheeler of Hurricane; sisters, Elsie (Ray) Pauley of Alum Creek and Margaret Jackson (Norman) of Dunbar; grandchildren, Latasha, Shyenna and Bella, also she is survived by Ellen Sowards who was known as the daughter she never had and her children, Aaron and Micah Sowards.

She touched many lives.

Service will be 3 p.m. Sunday, October 7, at Curry Funeral Home 2097 Childress Road Alum Creek with Minister Richard Runyan officiating. Burial will follow at Forks of Coal Cemetery Alum Creek. Family and friends will gather one hour prior to the service Sunday at the funeral home.

Online condolences may be expressed to the family at www.curryfuneralhome.org. In lieu of flowers the family request donations to the Teays Valley Nursing Home 590 North Popular Fork Road, Hurricane, WV 25526.

 
Turley, Dixie (I12603)
 
676

Funeral Information
 
TEEL, Patricia Earlene (I7928)
 
677

Somewhat of an historical oddity, Ira J. is listed in History of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, Vol. III as Ira J. Couch and his parents as George B. and Caroline E. Couch...and his wife as Generva Laing. However, his father was George Bristol Johnson, and his mother Caroline Elizabeth Couch, making him a Johnson, not a Couch.

After (presumably) burial with the Couch family in Lincoln Park, and upon reinterrments in Rosehill Cemetery, the family monument includes the names of Ira Couch and Caroline E. Gregory Couch, Sr. (Caroline Jr.'s parents), along with daughter, Caroline E. Couch Johnson, Jr., her husband George Bristol Johnson, and their daughter-in-law, Generva Laing Couch.

Clearly, Generva did not become a Couch by birth, or by marriage to Ira J. Johnson, son of Caroline E. Couch Johnson and George B. Johnson. So the questions arise: How did Ira J. Johnson become Ira J. Couch, and his wife Generva become Generva Laing Couch, rather than Ira J. and Generva Laing Johnson?

Text of the History of Trade is given below in hopes someone might have clarification for this:

p.77-78-- "Ira J. Couch--A native son of Chicago and a representative of one of the prominent and influential families of this city, Ira Johnson Couch is a son of George B. and Caroline E. Couch, and a grandson of Ira Couch, whose name is closely and influentially linked with the annals of civic and material development and progress in Chicago. The Board of Trade claims Ira J. Couch as one of its appreciative and valued members, and he is one of the interested principals in the representative firm of S. B. Chapin & Co., one of the foremost in the stock-investment business in both Chicago and New York and one that has definite precedence and influence in connection with the operations of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago and the Chicago Stock Exchange, with both of which important bodies Mr. Couch is actively identified, besides which he is to be designated as an able member of the bar of his native city, though he has not been actively engaged in the practice of his profession since 1900. Mr. Couch was born in Chicago on the 21st of June, 1871, and after making good use of the advantages aflforded in the public schools of the western metropolis he pursued a higher academic course in Beloit College, at Beloit, Wisconsin. In preparation for his chosen profession he then entered the Chicago College of Law, and in this institution he was graduted as a member of the class of 1896, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, his admission to the Illinois bar having been a virtual concomitant of his reception of the degree noted. After his graduation Mr. Couch became associated with the representative law firm of Arnd & Arnd, with which he continued his alliance until 1900, when he retired from the practice of law and turned his attention to the stock and bond business, of which he has become a successful representative in Chicago, as has he also in connection with operations on the Board of Trade. At the initiation of his activities along these lines he was fortunate in identifying himself with the firm of S. B. Chapin & Co., and of the same he has been a member since 1906. Though he has manifested no ambition for political preferment, Mr. Couch as a public-spirited citizen takes a lively interest in all that touches the well-being of his native city. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity he has received the thirtysecond degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, and he holds membership in the Chicago Athletic Club, the Chicago Golf Club and the Glen View Golf Club. In 1902 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Couch to Miss Genevra Laing, of Chicago, and they have three children?Ira Laing, Mary Elizabeth and Johnson."

 
Johnson, Ira J. (I3314)
 
678


And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.

But watch thou in all things, endure afflictions, do the work of an evangelist, make full proof of thy ministry.

For I am now ready to be offered, and the time of my departure is at hand.

I have fought long a good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept the faith.

Henceforth, there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give at that day, and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing.





James W. Proctor, 86, of Elkview, died Saturday, August 11, 2007.

He worked 29 years for the Department of Highways, and then went to Highway Paving for two more years. He preached for over 60 years all over West Virginia. He pastored several churches in Kanawha and Roane Counties. He was ordained through the Church of God Missions. He was a lifetime Pastor of Atkinson Memorial Church at Big Fork. He was a World War II veteran aboard the USS Alduamin (AK116).

Preceding him in death was his guiding light, joined together by God, wife of 55 years, Ida Mae Strickland Proctor; and several family members.

Left to cherish his memories are daughters, Sue Smith and husband Don of Pinch, Faye Stover and husband Ray of Elkview, with whom he made his home, and Wanda Smith and husband Benson of Gandeeville; brother, Junior Proctor of Elkview, Paul Proctor of Virginia, and Edgar Proctor of North Carolina; sisters, Janet Wilson of Walton and Mary Carte of North Carolina; seven grandchildren, James "Nuck" Morris and wife Linda of Elkview, Wendell "P-nut" Morris and wife Carrie of Sissonville, Clifford Stover and wife Bobie, Jeff Stover and companion Jacki Mae Dustin of Elkview, Jamey Stover and wife Stephanie of Cottontree, Lee Mae Mullins and husband Mark of Glen, Joy Lynn Wiseman of Parkersburg; 12 great-grandchildren, J. R. Morris, Joshua Morris, Justin Morris, Amber Stover, Nichole Stover, all of Elkview, Kyle Morris and Alexis Morris of Sissonville, J. W. Stover of Cottontree, Jessica Mullins and Walker Mullins of Glen, Becky Wiseman and "Little" Steve Wiseman of Clendenin.

A special thanks is extended to Kanawha Hospice Care for all of their love and special care.

The funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, August 15, at Myers Funeral Home with Pastors Ted Tawney and Hubert Woods officiating. Burial will be at Proctor Cemetery, Elkview, with military rites conducted by American Legion Post 61, Clendenin.

Visitation will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, August 14, at Myers Funeral Home.

Myers Funeral Home, Elkview, is in charge of arrangements.


 
Proctor, James Walker (I2053)
 
679
(Click on Obituary to View or Print in Separate Window or Tab)
 Myers, Daniel Scott (I11617)
 
680 Information from Robert Samuel Cromartie, MD (1869-1965)
The following information was found in a book that was in the possession of Robert Samuel Cromartie III. The book included information saved by his grandfather on his family. Much of the information is from the obituary of Annie Cromartie Council.

Graduated from Agnes Scott College, Atlanta, George, and after completing her education, she came back to Bladen to teach in the public schools. In early womanhood she was wed to Alexander McAllister Council, thus uniting two of the county's most prominent pioneer.

The obituary read as follows: "She was formerly a member of the Battle of Elizabethtown Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, releasing her membership when she was physically unable to attend the meetings.

Mrs. Council was a woman of the highest type of Christian character, and one of the best loved women in the county.
Keenly interested in every movement for the public good, she worked faithfully in the church and civic affairs.
A devoted wife and mother, a true and loyal friend, a consecrated Christian, she embodied the highest type of womanhood, and her memory will be long be blessed in the community in which she lived.

She is survived by three daughters: Mrs. George Sloan, Wilmington; Mrs. Evelyn Stuart, Rowland; Mrs. H. Milton Chason, Elizabethtown. By four sons: John C. Council, Winston-Salem; C. C. and G. S. Council of White Oak and M-Sgt. W. J. Council, Camp Lejeune. By one sister, Miss Bessie K. Cromartie, Jacksonville, Fla. By three brothers: Dr. R. S. Cromartie, Elizabethtown; A. Doane and Ben J Cromartie of Garland, RFD; by 22 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.

Christian Advocate, September 20, 1956, p. 15
Mrs. Annie Mary Cromartie Council was born January 13, 1872, in Bladen County near Garland. She was married to Alex McAlister Council in 1897. She was called to her heavenly home March 29, 1956. Her funeral was conducted in Bethlehem Church at White Oak, and she was laid to rest in the family cemetery. Surviving are seven of her eight children, twenty-two grandchildren and eleven great grandchildren.

Mrs. Council was one who will never die to those who knew her. To the community she was a constant inspiration and challenge. To her close friends she was a wonderful source of joy. To her family she was a perfect channel of devotion and loyalty. To the church she was an example of all it stands for in the expression of a human soul. To all who knew her she was a conveyor of high and enduring qualities of true culture and religion.

Mrs Council will be remembered by her pastors as one whose love for and knowledge of her church is surpassed by none. Last March, when a divine hand reached out from heaven's doors, Mrs. Annie Council grasped that hand with an inner joy and dignity that becomes one who has achieved sainthood.
A former pastor who shares with those who love her most - Willis R. Stevens.
 
Cromartie, Anna Mary (I1191)
 
681 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F537
 
682
  • 1825, 2 Dec: Jane received a pension at Decatur, IN re being widowed by Jonathan. Widows File 11.353
  • Married Isaac Hunt of Decatur after Jonathan's death.
  • Continued to receive pension payments as Jane Hunt until her death, after which her daughter, Brasier Hunt applied for pension payments. Images of pension applications, identify verification, and pension payments are available from national archives through ancestry.com.
 
Argardine, Jane (I2032)
 
683 =====
November 3, 2008, received email re 1910 census data, ancestry.com and One World Tree data as follows:

1910 census from Curry, Putnam, West Virginia showing Mary and Andrew Jackson Atkins (both age 27) married with children of Nada age 2 and Lilly age 1 month.

ancestry.com for Mary Frances Horton with a date of death of 1928. The census
record was located in Mullins family tree.

One World Tree shows a Mary Horton (b 1900 d 1928) married to Andrew Adkins. Her father is shown as William Horton and mother as Octavia Egnor b abt 1866, d 1888.
=====
 
Adkins, Nada (I25)
 
684 =====
1910 census from Curry, Putnam, West Virginia showing Mary and Andrew Jackson Atkins (both age 27) married with children of Nada age 2 and Silly [Sally] age 1 month.

ancestry.com for Mary Frances Horton with a date of death of 1928. The census record was located in Mullins family tree.

One World Tree shows a Mary Horton (b 1900 d 1928) married to Andrew Adkins. Her father is shown as William Horton and mother as Octavia Egnor b abt 1866, d 1888.

Nada (Adkins) Strickland (deceased oldest child of Mary Horton Adkins) gave her recollection of her mother's birth as being in Griffithsville, West Virginia; however also said she was born in Putnam County. Currently, Griffithsville is in Lincoln County, but many years ago might have been in Putnam or Cabell counties, as boundaries changed many times.
=====

Burial place variation:
================
MFH (Adkins) death cert. gives burial place as Burial Pauley Grave Yard, Big Chimney, WVA

Family-KNOWN burial site near entrance Rush Branch (dirt road) off Little Sandy Ck Rd WVA 
Horton, Mary Frances (I23)
 
685 =======
(their notes)
YEAR AGE EVENT/LOCATION {Source}
---- --- ----------------------------------------------

MAR: MARRIED FOUR TIMES
MAR: 1ST TO SMITH
MAR: 2ND TO ???
MAR: 3RD TO WILLIAM HORTON
MAR: 4TH TO JAMES SADDLER
BIR: 1856, 1857, OR 1860

Birth: ABT 1856 in VA (per 1870 census)
Birth: ABT 1857 in Per Anthony Ray Gould
Birth: ABT 1860 in Per Carolyn Saul
Birth: 1860 in Per Lincoln County book
Death: UNKNOWN
Census: 1860 not listed
Census: 1870 Listed as age 14, in Union Twp, Griffithsville PO #25, Lincoln Co, WV
=======
1870 Lincoln Co. WV Fed Census, Union Twp, Griffithsville PO, Pg4
#25-25 John W. Egnor 37, farmer, born VA, cannot read or write;
Lucinda 35, housekeeper, born VA, cannot read or write;
Mathias 16, labors on farm, born VA;
Martin 15, labors on farm, born VA;
Octavia 14, Mary 19; Martha 8; Lucinda Jr. 4, John 1

Doug Couch notes May 2009:
From various records found, the apparent order of marriages is 1)Smith, 2)Horton, 3)Plumley, 4)Saddler. Relatives of the time say there was an additional husband, Sutliff...order not known. She is said to be Indian...said to be full-blood Cherokee. For many years we did not know her given or surname. In late 2008, information surfaced showing her as Octavia Egnor, confirmed by several census records, etc.

 
Egnor, Octavia (I4552)
 
686 =================================================
Name: Junius W Perkins
Residence: Duplin county, Duplin, North Carolina
Age: 2 years
Calculated Birth Year: 1848
Birthplace: North Carolina
Gender: Male
Film Number: 444642
Digital GS Number: 4181076
Image Number: 00127
Line Number: 35
Dwelling House Number: 169
Family Number: 169
Collection: United States Census, 1850
=================================================
Name: Junious Perkins
Residence: , Carteret, North Carolina
Ward: Carteret District
Age: 12 years
Estimated Birth Year: 1848
Gender: Male
Page: 32
Family Number: 222
Film Number: 803890
DGS Number: 4237117
Image Number: 00480
NARA Number: M653
Collection: United States Census, 1860
=================================================
Name: Junius W Perkins
Birthplace: North Carolina
Relationship to Head of Household: Self
Residence: Plattsburg Ward 1, Clinton, Missouri
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Family Number: 57
Page Number: 3
Collection: United States Census, 1910
---also given: Wife, Nancy J., children: William
---C. son, Henry E. son, and Vennie J. dau.
=================================================
Name: Junius W Perkins
Residence: , Clinton, Missouri
Estimated Birth Year: 1849
Age: 71
Birthplace: North Carolina
Relationship to Head of Household: Self
Gender: Male
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Film Number: 1820913
Digital Folder Number: 4312400
Image Number: 00546
Sheet Number: 16
Collection: United States Census, 1920
---also given: Wife, Nancy Jane, child: Vennue J.
=================================================
 
Perkins, Junius Washington (I10433)
 
687 A child of Richard Higgins and Mary (Yates) is given in some family records as Ezra. It appears Ezra and Zerah are the same person. HIGGINS, Zerah (I5221)
 
688 A Duncan Downie is listed in info from Margaret Mason's notes as though a child of Angus, who it is pretty certain could not be a child of the wife of Angus (unknown Downie...apparently a married surname). Likely he is the son of John Downie, but it is unknown at this point. All Downie relationships are tentative, including wife Downie's presumed former marriage.

Duncan Downie born abt 1830, joined the 42nd Regiment 2 Nov 1849, and died 20 May ____, Killarney. 
Downie, John (I9365)
 
689 A-115-2 Berenz, Emma C. (I16238)
 
690 A-115-3 Hess, Elisabeth (I16237)
 
691 A-115-4 Berenz, Henry Sr. (I15930)
 
692 A-115-East End 10 Berenz, Marie (I16299)
 
693 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Melton, Aaliyah Mon'e (I9020)
 
694 Abel was born one day & died the next. Strickland, Abel (I2104)
 
695 Abigail Doane Lothrop gravestone inscription:

Here Lyes Interred ye Remains of Mrs. Abigail Lothrop
ye Relict of Mr. Samuel Lothrop Of Norwich
Bort At Plymouth Ano 1631 & Lived in Norwich
43 Years And dyed January 23D AnoD 1734-5 In ye 104Th Year Of Her Age.

Caulkins' History of New Londond gives the following notice of her deth, coppied from the New England Weekly Journal:
Mrs. Abigail Lothrop died at Norwich, Jan. 23, 1735, in her 104th year. Her father John Doane and his wife came to Plymouth in 1630, and there she was born the next year. She lived single till she was sixty years old and then married Mr. John (Samuel) Lothrop of Norwich, who lived ten years and then died. 
Doane, Abigail (I1374)
 
696 Abigail Sparrow was once listed in this database as a wife of John Doane. Seeing no evidence of this union, she has been removed from that lineage. I do not know who she is, and may be deleted entirely later. SPARROW, Abigail (I899)
 
697 About 1704, she was living in the family of David Melville at Eastham, and in 1707 and 1708 was employed at Samuel Cox's Iun, Boston. -- The Doane Family, 1902, p.33 (p.70 of PDF) DOANE, Ruhama (I1406)
 
698 Abraham (variously, Abram), son of Terah and Amethelo Or Unk, married his sister Sarah (variously, Sarai), and they gave birth to Isaac. Abraham lived for 175 years. Sarah lived for 127 years. Abraham had a son, Ishmael, by Hagar (variously, Hagara). And he also had six children by his servant Keturah: Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah. BEN TERAH, Abraham (I8029)
 
699 Abraham was a man of note in Waterbury, CT. He served as one of the towns first townsmen or selectmen. His house lot was to the west of John Welton's lot.
 
ANDREWS, Abraham (I4471)
 
700 According to "History and Genealogy of the Page Family...", p.127, Aaron "lived at Norwalk, Connecticut; married Mrs. Mary Winton; died without children." Her gravestone is found in St Pauls Cemetery in Norwalk, as is Aaron's. Family F771
 
701 According to "History and Genealogy of the Page Family...", p.125, John returned to his home state of Connecticut after some two decades in Sherbourne, Chenango County, New York, and died in the house where he was born in Norwalk. Pages 125-126 give his military record in the Revolutionary War. "The Hale Collection of Connecticut Cemetery Inscriptions, 414-10 St. Paul's Cemetery Records - Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut" confirms he was buried in Norwalk. Nash, Sgt. John IV (I14230)
 
702 According to additional information posted on Find A Grave (without documentation), the following ancestry is given for Henry Pauley (tracing only the paternal Pauley line here):
David Polly (1733-1785)     &     Agnes Adkins (1741-1798)
Edward David Polly (1713-1770)     &     Mary Pilsbury (1711-1787)
Edward David Polly (1670-1715)     &     Mary Merrow (1673-1718)
George Polly 1615-1683)     &     Elizabeth Winn (1625-1695)
Robert Poley (1582-1625)     &     Unknown
John Poley (1560-1601)     &     Unknown
Giles Poley (1539-1589)     &     Alice Tenderlove (1544-1580)
John Poley (1513-11580)     &     Margery Blyant (1518-1561)
Richard Poley (1480-1547)     &     Ann Clopton (1484-1550)
View Henry Pauley on Find A Grave
 
Pauley, Henry (I16925)
 
703 According to Snorri Sturluson's saga of Harald Fairhair, Mosterstong was descended from Horda-K of the Island of Moster, Tora Mosterstong (I8311)
 
704 Actor & Musician Burns, Edward David (I10441)
 
705 Ada de Warenne or Adeline de Varenne (c. 1120  DE WARREN, Adelaide (I6932)
 
706 Adam and Eve, according to Biblical sources, gave birth to a number of children, five of whose names have been recorded: Qayin (variously, Cain), Hevel, (variously, Abel), Sheth, (variously, Seth, Set, Sed and Sat-naal), Noraia, and Lebhudha (variously, Laphura). According to certain cultures, Qayin / Cain and Hevel / Abel were believed to have had twin sisters: Luluwa for Qayin / Cain, and Aklemia for Hevel / Abel. The female, Noraia is sometimes stated as the twin sister of Sheth / Seth. Adam is claimed to have lived to the age of 930 years, having been ?born? in the year 5500 B.C. Some researchers have adhered to the traditional date of 4004 B.C. If the ?traditional? dating were used, Adam?s death would have occurred in the year 3070 B.C. OF EDEN, Adam (I8081)
 
707 Adam III was born in a house on Gracechurch Street. Some records give a location as described as London, St. Peter's Parish. Winthrop, Adam III (I8218)
 
708 Adam Winthrop left his home at the age of seventeen and bound himself as an apprentice to Edward Altham in London for ten years. A clothier, Altham was elected to be Sheriff of London. After fulfilling his contract, Winthrop became a citizen of London in 1526.

According to Mayo, he worked hard and advanced in the Clothworkers' Company of London, and by 1551, he was chosen a Master of the Company, although his progress was not without a few bumps in the road. In 1538, as one of the Stewards, he was chastised "for disobeying the wardens in the search because that he would not suffer them to carry the cloth out of his house." Noting drying that Winthrop may have been "a little too enterprising for his own immediate good," Mayo states in 1543, he served time in the Fleet Prison and could not get out until he paid 600 pounds into the royal coffers. "His offense was negotiating with foreigners contrary to an edict of the King of England, but we do not know the nature of the negotiations which proved to be so expensive."

His offence could not have been too costly to him, however, because the very next year he purchased the Manor of Groton. With the prucase he became Lord of the Manor and Patron of the Church, for the property carried with it the right to name the local rector.

Four years later Edward, VI granted him arms and the rank of Gentleman. The arms were confirmed to his son, John, in 1592. (Information from Clopton Family Tree) 
Winthrop, Adam II (I8220)
 
709 add Coley family at/from http://www.couchgenweb.com/couch/simonc.htm COLEY, Peter Jr. (I3267)
 
710 Add this information to her page, record source and delete note if desired.
Lucy Crackel born July 11, 1837 in Edwards Co., IL. md Daniel Parker Gray on Sept 14, 1854. Daniel Parker Gray born April 11, 1832 in Wabash Co., IL. HIs father was Isaac Gray. Daniel served in Civl War for IL infantry with his brother-in-law Matthew Crackel, and he suffered a leg injury in the battle of Dallas which resulted in permanent disability. Daniel was member of Christian Church. He died May 11, 1909. Lucy then lived with her son, George Gray and his two children. She died Aug 5, 1910. Both buried in Antioch Cemetery, Wabash Co., IL. Had 10 children. I have those if you wish.

Lucy Crackel was dau of Joseph Crackel and Harriet Austin. Joseph born about 1800 in Owston Ferry, Lincolnshire, England. Md Ann Duffield there on Nov 4, 1822. He was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Crackel. He and Ann had 8 children, and after she died, Joseph and Harriet had three children, Lucy, Matthew, and Luke all three of which md and had children (obvious on Lucy). Matthew md twice and had three children. The 2nd mg was to a Gibson Co., IN gal and I have plenty of info.

Plenty more where that came from. I have Daniel Parker Gray documents
 
CRACKEL, Lucy (I4459)
 
711 Addison's first initial "J" is from his pension file to his wife, Lucy M. Ford, in 1924. Ford, J. Addison (I16785)
 
712 Additional children (Ackley & Bosworth): Alice, Ann, Anna, additional Sarah.

Alice died after all children born, DOB not given.

Ann buried same year as Mary's DOB.

Anna's DOB around the time which could be Hannah.

First Sarah after John, and indicates died (est) at or before 2 years old.

Second Sarah DOB (est) same as first Sarah's (est) death.
=========== 
Family F24694
 
713 Additional private information, unavailable. STRICKLAND, Richard (I2078)
 
714 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. STRICKLAND, Roger Dale (I5504)
 
715 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. STRICKLAND, Angela Maria (I5511)
 
716 Adela Capet, Ad OF FRANCE, Countess Adela of Flanders (I6033)
 
717 Adela of Normandy also known as Adela of Blois and Adela of England (c. 1062 or 1067  OF NORMANDY, Adela (I5983)
 
718 Adele or Adelaide of Aquitaine (or Adelaide of Poitiers) (c. 945 or 952  OF AQUITAINE, Adelaide of Poitou (I5877)
 
719 Adell was married, no children by marriage. TIDD, Adell (I11307)
 
720 adopted STRICKLAND, Richard (I2078)
 
721 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Walling, Mike (I10098)
 
722 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Smith, Paul E. (I10108)
 
723 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Smith, Laurie Jean (I10110)
 
724 adopted STRICKLAND, Roger Dale (I10646)
 
725 Adopted Gegg, Destry (I11357)
 
726 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Adkins, Octave (I36)
 
727 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Couch, Lisa Ann (I4532)
 
728 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Adkins, Octave (I36)
 
729 Adopted status of Adle, given in 1900 census. No data as to whether this was an adoption from outside the family or if she was the daughter of her mother, Phebe and a previous spouse. Rafter, Adel M. (I217)
 
730 After passing away in Florida, Eleanor was removed April 29, 1936, to be buried in Illinois. Freese, Eleanor E. (I16261)
 
731 Agatha, mentioned by Ordericus Vitalis as one of the daughters of William I of England and Matilda of Flanders, Agatha, who had been betrothed to Harold II, was afterwards demanded in marriage by Alphonso VI of Castile and delivered to his proxies to be conducted to him. But she, who had lost her former spouse who was to her liking, felt extreme repugnance to marry another. The Englishman she had seen and loved, but the Spaniard she was more averse to because she had never set eyes on him. She therefore, fervently prayed to the Almighty that she might never be carried into Spain, but that he would rather take her to himself. Her prayers were heard, and she died a virgin while she was on the road. Her corpse was brought back to and interred in Bayeux in 1079. OF NORMANDY, Agatha (I6041)
 
732 age 4 in 2007, Dixie Adkins Stewart's great grandchild through Ruthie
 
Diamond Olivia (I5499)
 
733 Age 7 months. Eskew, Sherman B. (I16822)
 
734 age 8 in 2007, Dixie Adkins Stewart's great grandchild through Ruthie Dealenna (I5501)
 
735 Age 85 in 1880 census. Purkeypile, Reuben (I8992)
 
736 age 9 in 2007, Dixie Adkins Stewart's great grandchild through Ruthie
 
Destiny (I5500)
 
737 Age at marriage calculated as 11 years old. Family F24694
 
738 Age Discrepancy
  • Details
    • A discrepancy exists between Sarah's birth date (as given) and her marriage date. Her birth date given here is from the Couch & Frost genealogies given at couchgenweb. However, even within those records, there are conflicting date information. Mary and Martha are given as twins, and yet as born years apart. It is very likely that Sarah was born before they were and closer to her oldest sibling, Thomas, born 1659. The History of Fairfield County, Connecticut (etc) gives John Andrews II married Sarah daughter of Simon Couch. John II is grandson to Francis Andrews, and son of John Andrews I, brother of Mary Andrews, wife of Simon Couch-(b.1633). This places John Andrews II and Sarah Couch of Simon 1633 in the same generation as cousins. There are other Simons and Sarahs; however this is the most likely age and familial connection when compared to other data. Probably she was simply born earlier than given here.
 
Family F27072
 
739 Agnes STEWART b: ABT 5 MAY 1678 in Ballochallan, Kilmadock, Perthshire, Scotland. Alison Mitchell's MI transcriptions read: "Laedere Noli. Lieut. Walter Stewart, wife Agnes Stewart 8.1.1756, age 80, by son John, 1760." (It is believed that the 1756 death is Agnes' and the 1760 reference is to the death of Walter.) Stewarts of the South records that John married a daughter of Stewart of Ballachallan, but no such daughter can be found. However Walter's wife, Agnes, is a near exact match for this Agnes, daughter of Duncan Stewart, 1st of Ballachallan. It is therefore suggested that Stewarts of the South was off by one generation and that it was actually Walter who married a Stewart of Ballachallan. Thus we suggest that Agnes Stewart married Lt. Walter STEWART, in Brig O' Turk. Stewart, Agnes (I9644)
 
740 Agnes was born after mother Annie's death, so might be from an earlier marriage. ANDERS, Agnes (I734)
 
741 Agnes was the second wife of Adam II, after his marriage to Alice Henny of London November 16, 1527. Sharpe, Agnes (I8224)
 
742 Alberic (Aubrey I) de Vere, Count Aubrey, "Sanglier," married before 1139 Beatrix of Ghisnes, Countess of Ghisnes in her own right, and daughter of Henry, Count of Ghisnes, and his wife Sibylla Alberic possessed numerous lordships in different shires, of which Cheniston (now Kensington), co. Middlesex, was one, and Hedingham, co. Essex, where his castle was situated, and where he chiefly resided, another. DE VERE, Alberic (Aubrey) I (I7083)
 
743 Alberic (Aubrey) de Vere, who was in high favor with King Henry I., was constituted by the monarch Great High Chamberlain of England in 1133, to hold the same in fee to himself and his heirs. He replaced Robert Malet, Lord of Eye in Suffolk, who had been banished and disinherited from that office. He married Alice (Adeliza) Clare (Tonebruge), daughter of Gilbert de Clare (de Tonebruge), and grand-daughter of Hugh de Clermont, Count of Clermont and his wife Marguerita. Alice became a nun at St. Osyth's Prioy after the death of her husband. In the 5th year of Stephen, 1140, while a joint sheriff (with Richard Basset, then Justiciary of England,) of Surrey, Cambridge, Essex, and several other counties, he was slain in a popular tumult at London. He died May 15, 1141, was buried in Colne Priory, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Aubrey. DE VERE, Alberic (I7642)
 
744 Alberto lived in Guayaquil, Ecuador. BALLADAIRES, Alberto (I4282)
 
745 Albie Dolezal is listed as an orphan in the 1900 census image. It is not known whether Albie was adopted or not. The next family in the census image shows a John Sprosty with wife, Alvisie C., and a servant named Josephine Dolejsi. Very likely Dolezal and Dolejsi are various attempts at spelling the same surname. It is possible that Albie and Josephine are orphaned siblings who became members of the two households (Sprosty and Sprosty-Pokorny). DOLEZAL, Albie (I4561)
 
746 Alexander also given as Elixander. Black, Alexander (I12168)
 
747 Alexander Stewart of Ardvorlich became chief of the Clan Mac-Mhic-Bhaltair, which means "sons of the son of Walter".  Stewart, Alexander 1st of Ardvorlich (I9388)
 
748 Alexander's birth year estimated from age 1 in 1850 census. DEGAN, Alexander (I4598)
 
749 Alexander's name is also given as Angus Alexander Doane Cromartie. Cromartie, Alexander Doane (I1167)
 
750 Alfred M. Hudson, 64
JUNE 16, 1942-FEB. 16, 2007

CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Alfred M. "Al" Hudson, 64, of Greenvillage Road, died Friday, Feb. 16, 2007, at Chambersburg Hospital.

Born June 16, 1942, in Coatesville, Pa., he was the son of the late Charles C. and Ruth Boyd Hudson.

He owned and operated his own business, Hudson Furniture, where he restored antique furniture.

He was a U.S. Army veteran, serving during the Vietnam War.

He served as Scoutmaster of Troop 246 in Greenvillage, Pa.

He is survived by his wife, Reingart "Gerti" von Ridder, whom he married July 23, 1966; two children, Mike Hudson of Scotland, Pa., and Angie Blaye of Greenvillage; one sister, Janet H. Stevens of Chambersburg; one brother, Charles Hudson of Chambersburg; stepfather, Jim Brooks of Florida; two stepbrothers, Kenneth Brooks of Chambersburg and Jim Brooks of Gap, Pa.; five grandchildren; and cousins, nephews and nieces.

Services will be Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Thomas L. Geisel Funeral Home, Chambersburg. The Rev. Richard Stone will officiate. Burial will follow in Parklawns Memorial Gardens.

The family will receive friends Wednesday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the funeral home.

Memorial donations may be made to The Unity Church, 927 Wetzville Road, Enola, PA 17025.
--------------------------------------
The Herald-Mail, Obituaries, February 19, 2007 
Hudson, Alfred M. (I10816)
 

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