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1 FRANCIS MARION BORDEAUX is one of the successful agriculturists of Drew County, Arkansas, owning 260 acres of land, and his farm, which comprises sixty acres in cultivation, is very fertile and carefully tilled, and consequently yields a large nnual income. He farms on the improved plan, using fertilizing preparations to improve his land, and his operations are being attended with the best results.
He was born on July 22, 1842, in New Hanover County, North Carolina, being the son of DANIEL BORDEAUX, who resided on the place that was settled by his Great-Grandfather, a French Huguenot. He remained in his native State until he was twenty-sx years of age; then came to Arkansas and married one of Drew County's daughters, Miss REBECCA THANKFUL LAMB, after which he purchased eighty acres of fine ridge land, and proceeded to make him a home with the above mentioned results. His union has resulted in the birth of the following children: ERNEST E., LaFAYETTE, MARGUERITE K., LEONORA L. EURENUS JULIA(N), HELEN F., ALICE REBECCA and DANIEL T.
In the month of June, 1861, Mr. BORDEAUX enlisted in the Confederate Army, remaining until after Lee's surrender under the command of D.H. Hill, commanding Division in Company C; First North Carolina State Troops Infantry, but after the death f General Jackson, who commanded the Corps, he was under General Ewell. He was in the attacking party in the seven days fight at Mechanicsville, remaining all through the battle, and was also in the fight and skirmish in the Shenandoah Valley, at Gettysburg and harper's Ferry, being also in the seven days fight at Richmond. He was taken prisoner of war until the cessation of hostilities when he was paroled in return home, where he has devoted his time and attention to the peaceful pursuit of farming. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace for six years in succession, and is a man who commands the respect of all who know him. He is a member of the Farmers Alliance. 
Bordeaux, Francis Marion (I320)
 
2

Alfred the Great, son of Ethelwulf, succeeded his brother, Ethelred I., reigning from 871 to 900. Alfred began as second-in-command to his eldest brother, King Ethelred I. There were no jealousies between them, but a marked difference of temperament. Ethelred inclined toward a religious viewpoint that faith and prayer were the prime agencies by which the heathen would be overcome. Alfred, though also devout, laid the emphasis upon policy and arms. He was born in 849 and died in 900. At twenty-four he became King. He married Lady Alswitha (Ealhswith), daughter of Ethelan, the Earl of Mercia, lineally descended from Crioda, 1st Earl of Mercia, who died in 594. She died in 904. Alfred was regarded as one of the noblest monarchs in British history. No name in English history is so justly popular as his. That he taught his people to defend themselves and defeat their enemies, is the least of the many claims to our grateful admiration; he did much more than this; he launched his people upon a great advance in civilization, and showed a horde of untaught countrymen that there were other and worthier pursuits than war or the pleasure of the table. "He was indeed one of those highly gifted men that would seem to be especially raised up by Providence to protect and advance his people." (Wurts, Vol I, p. 171). Alfred was born at Wantage, in Berkshire, in the year 849, ascended the throne in 871 at the age of 23, and reigned for thirty years. Young Alfred, according to the historian Asser, Bishop of Sherborne, was a comely person and of a sweeter disposition than his older brothers and consequently became the favorite of both his parents and was sent by them to Rome, while still a child in order that he might be anointed king by the Pope. But though Ethelwulf showed this especial instance of regard for his son, he altogether neglected his education, and the young prince in his twelfth year had not learned to read or write. But if he could not read for himself, he nevertheless loved to listen to the rude but inspiring strains of Saxon poetry when recited by others, and had he not been a king and statesman, he might easily have been a poet. In 871, Alfred succeeded as king, at a period when the whole country was suffering under the ravages of the Danes, and the general misery was yet further increased by a raging pestilence, along with the general dissentions of the people. Alfred now for the first time took the field against these ruthless invaders with such skill and courage, that he was able to maintain the struggles till a truce was concluded between the combatants. Neither was this the worst of the evils that beset the Saxon prince. Any compact he might make with one party, had no influence whatever upon others of their countrymen, who had different leaders and different interests. No sooner had he made terms with one horde of pirates than England was invaded by a new force of them under Rollo; and when he had compelled these to abandon Wessex, he was attacked by fresh bands of Danes settled in other parts of England. So long, however, as they ventured to meet him on the open field, his skill secured him the victory; till, taught by repeated defeats, they had recourse to other tactics. That is, suddenly to land and ravage a apart of the country, and when a force opposed them, they retired to their ships, and passed to some other part, which in a like manner they ravaged, and then retired as before, until the country, completely harassed, pillaged and wasted by their incursions, was no longer able to resist them. Then they ventured safely to enter and to establish themselves. Therefore, Alfred, finding a navy necessary, built England's first fleet. After much fighting over the years he at last routed the Danes at Ethendune (Edington) in 878 with so much slaughter that they were glad to obtain peace on such terms as he chose to dictate. As merciful as he was good and brave, he then, instead of killing them, proposed peace on condition that they should altogether depart from the western part of England and that Guthrun, their leader, should become a Christian, in remembrance of the religion which taught Alfred, the conqueror, to forgive the enemy who had so injured him. Thereupon Guthrun embraced Christianity and became to adopted son of god-child of Alfred. Encouraging the arts and sciences, he founded Oxford University. He made London the capital of England, fortified it in 886, and carried on a defensive war with the Danes from 894 until they withdrew in 897. He organized judicial and educational reforms, compiled a code of laws, rebuilt the schools and invited learned monks from the continent and from Wales to his court to teach the young men there. He was himself a man of much learning; he translated from Latin into Anglo-Saxon parts of the ecclesiastical writings of Bede and others. He was the author of the famous Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the first history written in any modern language. He died October 28, 901, aged 52. 
KING OF WESSEX, Alfred 'the Great' (I6021)
 
3

children
Campbell
William T.
John
Mary "Polly"
Virginia Jane
Elizabeth "Betty" Ann
Washington
Ruth
Canada
Lewis
Joseph
Nancy
 
CAMPBELL, Susanna (I5124)
 
4

Higgins-Mapes Family Association 
LITHERLAND, Mathew (I3404)
 
5

http://www.gulbangi.com/genrpts/descnsnow.pdf 
SNOW, Nicholas (I911)
 
6

Mr. Cusick is first husband of Mary Jane Leek, second wife of Walter Ransom Couch (per IL Marr Index). 
CUSICK (I5265)
 
7

Notes for Maria Ramsey:
Note, Wanda Gaffke Questions if this Maria is the same as Mary B.
 
RAMSEY, Mary B. (I3079)
 
8

REFN: 1172
On 23 Apr 1686. Probate on 25 Jun 1686 Archdeaconry court, Bodmin,
Cornwall.
[huffmanjr.ged]
_P_CCINFO 1-65642 
BULLER, Katterren (I5712)
 
9

YEAR AGE EVENT/LOCATION {Source}
---- --- ----------------------------------------------

1844 BIR: I HAVE MONROE CO,VA J J ADKINS HAS BOONE CO,WVA
1850 6 RES: 10TH DISTRICT, CABELL CO., VA IN CENSUS PAGE 38
1850 6 MIS: NAME MARY G
1862 MAR: IGI 8707802 72
1862 MAR: BOONE CO., VA OR KANAWHA CO., VA
MIS: FROM VIOLET G. NOBLE
4108 E. GRANADA
PHOENIX, AZ 85008
(602) 275-4008
 
EGNOR, Mary Susan (I5067)
 
10
=======================================================
CHECK THE ORIGINAL GEDCOMS FOR THIS MISSING INFORMATION!!!!!
=======================================================

Line in Record @I003@ (RIN 3) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
ALIA Johannes /Aegendener/, Eigenter

Line in Record @I003@ (RIN 3) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
CENS

Line in Record @I003@ (RIN 3) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
CENS

Line in Record @I003@ (RIN 3) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
WILL

Line in Record @I003@ (RIN 3) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
WILL

Line in Record @I003@ (RIN 3) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
NATU

=======================================================


Listed in the book NEW WORLD IMMIGRANTS on page 6 as John Eigender who was a passenger on the Brittania and settled in Bucks County.

Johannes and Margarita Aegendener arrived in Philadelphia, PA, 21 September 1731 aboard the ship "Britannia" sailing from Rotterdam, Holland by way of Cowes England. (Johannes Agender may be found on the passenger list at: http://c-23.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/archives/pa/1pa/ships/britann.txt) Their names and ages, along with that of their children, were recorded at the landing (but is not on the internet site aforementioned).

The Britannia's passengers (men, women, and children) averaged 22 years in age. Among the youngest aboard was a 15 day old child and a 5 week old child.

They settled in Lehigh County, PA. farming on a 300 acre tract of land. Johannes became a naturalized citizen there in 1747. Following the sale of his land he and at least three of his grown children (Henry and 2 daughters) migrated to Rowan County, N.C. Johannes' will is in the North Carolina Archives in Raleigh, N.C. The will is written in German. Research by Dr. Roy A. Agner, Jr. of Rowan County, N.C., states that Johannes and Margarita lived in Switzerland before coming to America. It is believed they were of German heritage. (This is probably based on the microfilmed Power of Attorney found in the NC State Archives--this film is now too illegible to be read)

Records of his children are in the Jordan Lutheran Church in Lehigh County. He is documented as a baptism sponsor in the Egypt Reformed Church. See: http://c-23.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/archives/pa/lehigh/church/egyp0001.txt, which shows that Johannes & Margaretha Aegender were sponsors for:
TRAXEL, Johannes, son of the respectable Peter TRAXEL, church censor of the
Reformed congregation here, and wife Juliana Catharina TRAXEL; b. -; bap.
Oct. 26, 1736, by Rev. GOETSCHI; sp. Nicolaus KERN, Johannes EGENDER,
Margaretha EGENDER.

Per the Jordan Lutheran Church Record Book 1740-1850, translated by Rev. A.S. Leiby, Johannes and Margaretha Egender were sponsors of Johann Nicklaus Senders, who was born 18 May 1741 and baptized 14 Jun 1741. His parents were Johann & Maria Christina Senders. Others sponsors were Nicklaus & Margaretha Kern.

Johannes' other son, Ludwig, migrated to Frederick Co (Elizabethtown/Hagerstown), then Washington Co. (Sharpsburg) MD. Ludwig's sons migrated to Rockbridge Co. VA. Additional information, although not completely accurate, is contained in the book "Rockbridge County, Virginia, Heritage Book 1778- 1997", published by the Rockbridge Area Genealogical Society, 1997.

The surname spelling differs considerably from document to document. The Aegender name can be found as Igender, Igonter, Iginor, Eigenter, Aegener, Aigner, Egener, Egender, Agender, Agner, Egner, Agnor, Aigner, Egnor, etc.

Concerning Johannes "will":
A translation of the 1757 will (actually power of attorney) of Johannes AGNDER, supposed to have been recorded in Will Book A, page 2, Rowan County, NC.

Translated from a photostatic copy of the original, which was hand written in German, by Dr. Frank P. Albright, Director of Museums, Old Salem, Inc. Winston-Salem, NC and Dr. Roy A. Agner, Jr. of Salisbury, NC.

January 24, 1757

In the presence of the undersigned acquaintances by signature and in the presence of my children, in as much as I am on my sick bed, I assign to Conrad Michel to collect my rights to my paternal and maternal inheritance out of Switzerland, which inheritance is in Binsaltamen bei__________. Herewith I hand over to the aforementioned Conrad Michel willingly with full power hereafter the business rights, to collect it. Therefore please permit the aforementioned person to take unencumbered my inheritance as the same person to whome the highest authorities in Switzerland entrusted it. Even if I wished to come for it myself my old age would not permit me to come myself. The seventieth year is upon me. To be sure you have written me to come myself but it is impossible. Let Conrad Michel carry it out. That is as good as if I did it myself.

Johannes Agnder [signature]

Georg Brunner [signature]
Conrad Michel [signature]

Anyone interested in obtaining their own copy directly from the NC State Archives should write a check for $8 (June 1999 pricing -- made payable to North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources) and send a request to:

Department of Cultural Resources
Division of Archives and History
Archives and Records Section
109 E. Jones Street
4614 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-4614

I would include in the request that Archivist Kimberly Andersen Cumber found the record under the spelling AGNDER, Johannes for 1758 in the book: Rowan County Original WIlls, 1743-1900, CR.085.801.1 
Aegender, Johannes (I5098)
 
11 "The progenitor of a large branch of the Pilcher family was 1____ Pilcher, whose given name is not known to the writer. He emigrated, it is said, to America early in the eighteenth century, and settled in culpeper County, Virginia.e of his sons was Joshua Pilcher.
"2Joshua Pilcher was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, where he married, and where, perhaps, all of his children were born. He removed to Lexington, Ky., in the year 1793. He had eight children, namely: 3Fielding, sup>Shadrach, 3Benjamin, 3Zachariah, 3Moses, 3John, 3Joshua and 3Margaret Pilcher." (continues)
Historial Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families including the Bowen, Russell, Owen, Grant, Goodwin, Amis, Carothers, Hope, Taliaferro, and Powell Families, by Margaret Campbell Pilcher, Nashville, Tenn. 1911. 
Pilcher, Mr. (I12120)
 
12 1. Grover "Govey" ADKINS; m. 20 Dec 1825, Greenbrier Co., VA, Elizabeth ADKINS
2. Margaret ADKINS, b. 1801; m. 13 Jun 1825, Cabell Co., VA, John RICHMOND
3. Larkin ADKINS, b. 1803; m. Elizabeth __?__
4. Elizabeth ADKINS, b. ca. 1807; m. 17 Jun 1848, Raleigh, VA, Matthew ADKINS
5. Mary ADKINS, b. 1808
6. Rebecca ADKINS, b. 1807/8
7. Robert ADKINS, b. 1810; m. Nancy LILLY
8. Barbara "Barbary" ADKINS, b. 1814
9. Rickells ADKINS, b. 1815; m. 27 Jul 1838, Raleigh, VA, Lovey WILLIS
10. Nancy ADKINS, b. 1816; m. 1 Apr 1837, Greenbrier Co., VA [now WV], Robert Jefferson BENNETT
11. Anderson ADKINS, b. 1819; m. 5 Aug 1842, Raleigh, VA, Ann KIOUS
Children with Mary Ann WILLIS ? said to be born in Montgomery Co., VA:
. Lauden ADKINS
. James ADKINS
. Elizabeth ADKINS, b. 20 Dec 1853
. Sarah ADKINS
. Cumberland ADKINS, b. 9 Jul 1859
Pretty hard for Parker to have a son in 1859 if he died in 1857.

 
Family F25172
 
13
VIEW NOTES & JOURNAL
 
Abbott, Bvt. Brig. Gen. Ira C. (I10421)
 
14 Alexander I., the Fierce, born about 1077, King of Scotland, ascended January 8, 1107, died April 25, 1124. He was absent from Scotland in the invasion of Wales in the summer of 1114, and in cooperation with Henry I of England. He married Sybila. KING OF SCOTLAND, Alexander I "the Fierce" (I6073)
 
15 Edmund I., the Magnificent. was born in 922, the twelfth of his father's fifteen children. The first of the six Boy Kings, he reigned from 939 to 946. He had to meet a general uprising of the Danes of Mercia as well as those of the North. In te suppression of this he showed himself to be a great statesman as well as a great warrior. Little is definitely known about the policy of the Scots at this time but it appears that they joined the English whenever they were afraid of the Danes, and joined the Danes whenever they were afraid of the English. Edmund made it to be the interest of the Scottish King permanently to join the English. The southern part of the kingdom of Strathclyde had for some time been under the English Kings. In 945 Edmund took the remainder, but gave it to Malcolm on condition that he should be his fellow worker by sea and land. The king of the Scots thus entered into a position of dependent alliance towards Edmund. A great step was thus taken; the dominant powers in the island were to be English and Scots, not English and Danes. Edmund thought it worth while to conciliate the Scottish Celts rather than to endeavor to conquer them. The result of Edmund's statesmanship was soon seen, but he did not live to gather its fruits. On May 26, 946 an outlaw named Lief, who had taken his seat at a banquet in his hall, slew him as Edmund was attempting to drag him out by his hair. He was succeeded by his brother Edred. He married Princess Elgiva (Aelfgifu)., known as the "Fairies Gift,." who died in 944. KING OF ENGLAND, Edmund I 'the Magnificent' (I5780)
 
16 Henry de Newburgh (so called from the castle of that name in Normandy)was the first who bore the title of Earl of Warwick, after the Norman Conquest. He was born in 1046, a younger son of Roger de Bellomont, Earl of Mellent. When this person obained the earldom is not exactly ascertained, but Sir William Dugdale presumes the period to be towards the close of the Conqueror's reign, "for then," he says, "King William having begirt Warwick with a mighty ditch, for the precinct of its walls, and erected the gates at his own charge, did promote this Henry to the earldom, and annexed thereto the royalty of the borough, which at that time belonged to the crown." But, though Henry de Newburgh was made Earl of Warwick by the first Norman sovereign, he was not invested with all the lands attached to the earldom until the ensuing reign, as we find William Rufus, soon after his accession to the throne, conferring upon him the whole inheritance of Turchil de Warwick, a Saxon, who, at the coming of Duke William, had the reputation of earl. The name of this Henry appears as a witness to the charter of King Henry I., whereby that prince confirmed the laws of Edward the Confessor, and granted many other immunities to the clergy and laity. He married Margaret of Moreton (Perche), daughter of Geoffrey, Count de Moreton (Perche), and sister of Rotrode, Earl of Perche, and they had two daughters and five sons. NEWBURGH, Henry de 1st Earl of Warwick* (I6818)
 
17 "(div.)" - not specified, but appears she was divorced from Evart prior to remarrying Dorothy, by whom he had issue. MAURITZ, Alma (I2523)
 
18 "Anny"

Author: , Donna Lu
Title: Ahnentafel-Litherland, Ellen
Publication: Our Litherland Family: Entries: 1233 Updated: Sat Mar 27 06:57:012004 Contact: DonaLu
Text: Our Litherland FamilyEntries: 1233 Updated: Sat Mar 27 06:57:01 2004 Contact: DonaLu--------------------------------------------------------------------------------This family is posted here so that additions and corrections can
Title: 1860 US Census Friendsville Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 8 June1860, Page #: 26, PO: Friendsville, the family of William Litherland
Publication: Image: 1860-653_234-0028 & 1860-653_234-0029
Text: 1860 US Census Friendsville Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 8 June1860, Page #: 26, PO: Friendsville34 184 184 William Litherland 36 M - Farmer 500 250 IN --- - 3435 - - Susan " 31 F - - - - KY --- - 3536 - - Joseph
Page: 13 b in Indiana
Title: 1850 US Census Troy Twp., Perry Co., Indiana, 30 August 1850, Page:369, the family of William Litherland.
Publication: Image: 1850-M432_165-0057 & 1850-M432_165-0058
Text: 1850 US Census Troy Twp., Perry Co., Indiana, 30 August 1850, Page:3691 359 360 William Litherland 26 M - Farmer 175 IN --/ - 12 - - Susan " 21 F - - - KY --/ - 23 - - Joseph " 4 M - - - IN --- - 34 -
Page: 3 b in Indiana
Title: 1870 US Census Lick Prairie Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 27 June1870, Page #: 2, PO: Cardo Point, Ill., the family of Mundy, Ezra
Publication: Image: 1870-M593_286-0102
Text: 1870 US Census Lick Prairie Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 27 June1870, Page #: 2, PO: Cardo Point, Ill.25 13 13 Mundy, Ezra 25 M W Farmer 2500 600 IL -- - - --- -/ - 2526 - - --- Anny 23 F W Keeping house - - IL -- - - --- -- - 2
Page: 23 b in Illinois
Title: 1860 US Census Friendsville Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 8 June1860, Page #: 26, PO: Friendsville, the family of William Litherland
Publication: Image: 1860-653_234-0028 & 1860-653_234-0029
Text: 1860 US Census Friendsville Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 8 June1860, Page #: 26, PO: Friendsville34 184 184 William Litherland 36 M - Farmer 500 250 IN --- - 3435 - - Susan " 31 F - - - - KY --- - 3536 - - Joseph
Title: 1850 US Census Troy Twp., Perry Co., Indiana, 30 August 1850, Page:369, the family of William Litherland.
Publication: Image: 1850-M432_165-0057 & 1850-M432_165-0058
Text: 1850 US Census Troy Twp., Perry Co., Indiana, 30 August 1850, Page:3691 359 360 William Litherland 26 M - Farmer 175 IN --/ - 12 - - Susan " 21 F - - - KY --/ - 23 - - Joseph " 4 M - - - IN --- - 34 -
Title: 1870 US Census Lick Prairie Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 27 June1870, Page #: 2, PO: Cardo Point, Ill., the family of Mundy, Ezra
Publication: Image: 1870-M593_286-0102
Text: 1870 US Census Lick Prairie Precinct, Wabash Co., Illinois, 27 June1870, Page #: 2, PO: Cardo Point, Ill.25 13 13 Mundy, Ezra 25 M W Farmer 2500 600 IL -- - - --- -/ - 2526 - - --- Anny 23 F W Keeping house - - IL -- - - --- -- - 2 
LITHERLAND, Naomi Anna (I4047)
 
19 "Concerning his ancestry, different theories have been advanced one of which claims that he descended from Rongwald, the Norwegian Viking, father of Duke Rollo the Dane, through Hrolf Turstan (living in 920), the former's grandson. Hrolf followed Rollo to Neustria, where he married Gerlotte, daughter of Thibaud I. le Tricheur, Count of Blois, Chartres and Tours, and became to ancestor of the powerful Norman houses of Avranches, Briquebec, Crispin, and Montfort-sur-Risle. This opinion is expressed by d'Anisy and de St. Marie in their "Recherches sur le Domesday," wherein they are supported by "Norman People, Cleveland, and partially by Planche, but the two generations immediately preceding Gilbert need clarification and substantiation."

"Mr. Stacy Grimalsi records his descent from Crispina, a supposed daughter of Duke Rollo the Dane and others accord him Roman descent which he may have had from some unknown ancestor."

The generally accepted opinion that Gilbert I. was descended from the ducal family of Normandy possibly through one of the numerous children of Richard I., Duke of Normandy, or a female offspring of William Longswood (Longsword), second duke, persists, in which event he married a near relative. The many historical references to his lofty ancestry, the important fortresses which he possessed in heredity, his vast domains and the high esteem in which he was held by duke Robert I., signifies a very close connection. Certain it is, however, that his children were descended from Richard I. since Gilbert's wife Gonnor (Gunnor) was the daughter of Baldric the Teuton, and a niece of Gilbert, Count of Brionne. This fact and the names of his immediate family and descendants have been historically recorded. St. Anselme confirms it by referring to one of his grandsons as of the "first blood of Normandy." They had issue, Gilbert II., hereditary custodian of Tillieres, William, Count of Vexin, Robert, who distinguished himself in Constantinople, where he was a famous general and greatly honored by the emperor, on which account he was poisoned through jealousy by the Greeks before 1073, leaving no issue."

The above account seems to indicate that the lineage that follows is not related to the Crispins, but rather to Gilbert, Count of Brionne. Further investigation of this point is needed. In any event Gilbert, Count of Brionne had an eldest son, Richard Fitzgilbert. 
OF BRIONNE, Count Gislebert "Crispin" (I6776)
 
20 "Cynthia"
 
DEWITT, Syntha (I3887)
 
21 "Frank"

 
LITHERLAND, Francis Lincoln (I3473)
 
22 "He was an ardent Democrat, and a slave holder. He hated abolitionism and contended for the rights of slavery as he understood those rights, to the commencement of the war. But he was never in favor, so far as I have been able to learn, of secession." - ibid, p.13. Walker, Gov. William (I7091)
 
23 "He was Head Chief of the Wyandot tribe while it was yet in Ohio, and was Postmaster of the town of Upper Sandusky, Ohio." - ibid. Walker, Gov. William (I7091)
 
24 "In the years following the close of the Revolutionary War many of the people of Virginia left the state. In the fall of 1799 James (at the age of 67) and Sarah packed several wagons and headed westward with the family to Ohio. Their son William had already made this trip a couple of years before and they were probably following his path. They traveled across the mountains thru Wheeling to the Ohio River where James and his sons built large flatboats to carry the wagons and horses to Cincinnati. Winter caught up with the party and James became sick from exposure. The family found a vacant house along the Kentucky side of the river and moved in but James passed away and was buried at a place called Red Stone (near Maysville, KY). Sarah then took her family the rest of the way downriver and in the spring of 1800 they settled in Centerville, Montgomery Co. Ohio Territory." (undocumented history of Terry Lee Edwards family tree) Buckles, Capt. James Sr. (I11706)
 
25 "John, the only sonne of Adam Winthrop and Anne his wife, was borne in Edwardston abovesaid on Thursday about 5 of the clocke in the morning the 12 daie of January anno 1587 in the 30 yere of the reigne of Qu: Eliza:"

So, exactly, reads his birth-record, - a smiling one, plainly,?as his father set it down in his private diary a little more than three hundred years ago. The date is expressed after the rule of the Old Style; now it would be Jan. 22, 1588. Win the year preceding the fated Queen of Scots had laid her fair head upon the block. The last night of the July following saw the signal-fires flaming all up the coast that announced the arrival of the Armada in the Channel. The child was born away from home, under the roof, probably, of his maternal grandparents. Adam Winthrop lived at Groton, contiguous to Edwardston, in the lower part of Suffolk, sixty miles northeast of London; was lord of Groton Manor, an estate granted to his father - also named Adam, as was his father before him - by Henry VIII, at the dissolution of the monasteries. 
Family F26444
 
26 "Mamie"

Stories told to Tammy Beckemeyer from Beryl Audrey Purdin Southard and
Dorothy Bernice Southard
Edgar..
Mamie was tall for a woman of her day about 5ft 9. She was taller than
her husband.
She also was a very private person. A lot of stories had to be told after
her death.
She walked a great deal about 8 to 10 miles a day till she was very old.
People were amazed at how
far she would go for her age. (see note under spouse) 
LITHERLAND, Mary Caroline (I3430)
 
27 "The General Assembly met on the 12th of October, [1710] when Mr. James Rennet and Mr. Samuel Couch represented Fairfield. Mr. Samuel Couch was confirmed captain, Mr. John Osborn lieutenant and Mr. Benjamin Rumsey ensign of Green's Farms train-band." - The History of Fairfield County, Connecticut, 1700-1800, Vol. II COUCH, Capt. Samuel (I2769)
 
28 "This family is one of the most illustrious in both France and England. Errand de Harcourt is mentioned by La Roque, the French historian of this great house, Pere Anselm, and other genealogists as the personage referred to by Wace which reads "sire de Herevourt was there also, riding a very swift horse." They are not supported in this conclusion by Le Prevost, as he favors Anchetil, the father of Errand, or Robert, his younger brother. The burden of opinion is, however, against this eminent historian. Turquetil, Seigneur de Turqueville, and de Tanqueraye, circa 1001, appears in several charters concerning the abbeys of Fecamp and Bernay. He was lord of Nuefmarche-en-Lions, governor of the boy-Duke, William, and was treacherously assassinated between 1035 and 1040 by hirelings of Raoul de Gace. Turquetil was the second son of Torf, the son of Bernard the Dane, which latter was the governor and regent of Normandy in 912, from whom descended the sires de Beaumont, comtes de Meulent, the barons of Cancelles and Saint-Paer, the lords of Gournay and Milly, the barons of Neubourg, the vicomtes of Evreux, the earls of Leicester, and many other noble French and English houses. Tuequetil married Anceline, sister of Toustain, Seigneur de Montfort-sur-Risle, and had issue Anchetil, and Walter de Lescelina who married Beatrice, abbess of Montivilliers, natural daughter of Richard I., Duke of Normandy, as well as Leceline de Turqueville, the wife of William, Comte d'Exmes (later d'Eu), an illegitimate son of the same duke. Anchetil was the first to assume the name of Harcourt from the bourg of Harcourt, near Brionne, and married Eve de Boessey-le-Chapel, by whom he had seven sons and one daughter. The eldest was Errand, who predeceased his father, and was succeeded by Robert as head of the house. Jean, Arnoul, Gervais, Yves, and Renauld were the other sons. Errand de Harcourt commanded the archers of Val de Ruel at the battle of Hastings, but returned to Normandy in 1078 and probably died soon after. His younger brother, Robert, who accompanied him in the Conquest, was the ancestor of this distinguished house." And further on pg. 93-94: "Robert de Harcourt, surnamed le Fort, was the son of Anchetil and the younger brother of Errand de Harcourt... He built the castle of Harcourt in Normandy and was by his wife Colette d'Argouges the father of seven sons, the eldest of whom, William, having arrayed himself with King Henry I. against his brother Robert Curthose (Courteheuse), rendered his monarch signal service; he also commanded the troops which defeated the count of Meulent in Normandy in 1124. He was on this account awarded with large estates in England, which were inherited by his second son, Ivo, who became permanently settled there. The English Harcourts were seated at Stanton-Harcourt in Oxfordshire, which was obtained through the heiress of the Camvilles, whose mother received it as a marriage gift from her cousin, Queen Adeliza of Louvain, the second wife of King Henry I." NEUFMARCHE, Turquetil (Turqueville) de * (I7629)
 
29 "Thomas Couch sailed for England in 1689...The tradition in the family is, that the vessel in which he sailed for England, was taken by the French & his fate was never known." History of Fairfield, Vol.1, p.364 COUCH, Thomas (I2740)
 
30 "Thomas de Heydon was appointed Judge in Norfork, England by Henry VIII." (Historical Society, book, Hayden Family) - Note: King Henry VIII lived considerably after this period. Above comment is in error. de Heydon, Thomas Jr. (I11199)
 
31 "WILLIAM, ROBERT and JOHN McCLELLAN were sons of a pioneer farmer, who, at the time of the Revolutionary War, lived in a part of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, which is now embraced in Franklin county, at the base of the Cove or North mountain, near where the town of Mercersburgh now is [as of publication in 1871]. Here the boys were schooled in all the arts of woodcraft and inured to all the hardships of frontier life." Pioneer Biography, McBride, 1871 McClellan, Robert W. (I2092)
 
32 "WILLIAM, ROBERT and JOHN McCLELLAN were sons of a pioneer farmer, who, at the time of the Revolutionary War, lived in a part of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, which is now embraced in Franklin county, at the base of the Cove or North mountain, near where the town of Mercersburgh now is [as of publication in 1871]. Here the boys were schooled in all the arts of woodcraft and inured to all the hardships of frontier life." Pioneer Biography, McBride, 1871 McClellan, William (I2091)
 
33 "WILLIAM, ROBERT and JOHN McCLELLAN were sons of a pioneer farmer, who, at the time of the Revolutionary War, lived in a part of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, which is now embraced in Franklin county, at the base of the Cove or North mountain, near where the town of Mercersburgh now is [as of publication in 1871]. Here the boys were schooled in all the arts of woodcraft and inured to all the hardships of frontier life." Pioneer Biography, McBride, 1871 McClellan, John (I2090)
 
34 • About Archibald
   Previous information showed Mary Fuller (married: Young) as wife of John Agner, Jr., and mother of Archibald. However, since Archibald was born in 1811, it is unlikely he was born as son of Mary Fuller. 
Family F24934
 
35 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. GRAY, Belinda Sue (I12233)
 
36 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. GRAY, Mark Allen (I12232)
 
37 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Kempfer, Jennifer Erin (I12397)
 
38 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Fitz Alan, Sir Richard 11th Earl of Arundel, 9th Earl of Surrey (I7696)
 
39 • Pastor, Christian Church, Disciples of Christ
• Johnson Bible College, TN
• Bachelors & Masters, Butler School of Religion (Christian Theological Seminary)
• Ministry:
Owensville, Gibson Co, IN
Sandborn, Knox Co, IN
Princeton, Gibson Co, IN
Middletown, Henry Co, IN
Hillside Church, Indianapolis, Marion Co, IN
Greensburg, Decatur Co, IN
Washington, Washington Co, IN
Auburn, DeKalb Co, IN
Albion, Edwards Co, IL
Beloit, Rock Co, WI
• Retired to Indianapolis, Marion Co, IN 
GRAY, Roy Alva (I12230)
 
40 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. GRAY, Kenneth Lee M.D. (I12231)
 
41  
VIEW BIOGRAPHY
Abbott, Bvt. Brig. Gen. Ira C. (I10421)
 
42 "The progenitor of a large branch of the Pilcher family was 1____ Pilcher, whose given name is not known to the writer. He emigrated, it is said, to America early in the eighteenth century, and settled in culpeper County, Virginia. One of his sons was Joshua Pilcher.

"2Joshua Pilcher was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, where he married, and where, perhaps, all of his children were born. He removed to Lexington, Ky., in the year 1793. He had eight children, namely: 3Fielding, 3Shadrach, 3Benjamin, 3Zachariah, 3Moses, 3John, 3Joshua and 3Margaret Pilcher." (continues)
Historial Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families including the Bowen, Russell, Owen, Grant, Goodwin, Amis, Carothers, Hope, Taliaferro, and Powell Families, by Margaret Campbell Pilcher, Nashville, Tenn. 1911. 
Pilcher, Joshua (I12119)
 
43 'He belonged to the Big Turtle Clan of the Wyandot tribe. He had two Indian Names. The first was Hah-shah'-rehs, meaning "the stream over full"; the second was Sehs'-tah-roh, meaning "bright," and is taken from the brightness of the turtle's eye as seen in clear water.' - Journals of Provisional Governor William Walker, p.12. Walker, Gov. William (I7091)
 
44 (10 miles east of Monticello) Hall, Marian Bertha (I2285)
 
45 (10 miles east of Monticello) Lamb, Thomas Edward (I111)
 
46 (10) Robert, Dictus Boyt, first mentioned (1262) in a charter by Sir John Erskine, of the lands of Halkill, in which he is designated as Robertus de Boyd, Miles. He took part in the Battle of Largs, in Ayrshire, October 3, 1263, between the Scots and King Haco (or Hacon) of Norway, for possession of western Scotland and the Islands. The result was a complete victory for the Scots. The word Goldberry was placed on his Arms in commemoration of his services in this battle in the vicinity of Goldberry Hill, near Keppenburn. He also received a grant of several lands in Cunninghame, Ayrshire, from King Alexander III. He died about the year 1270... Boyt, Robert Dictus (I9607)
 
47 (1920 census suggests an 1898 birth year) Rafter, Adle M. (I217)
 
48 (1st wife of Jacob, son of William V. Adkins/Atkinson)
 
Family F25071
 
49 (2nd son) MacNab, John 9th Clan Chief (I9291)
 
50 (2nd wife of Jacob, son of William V. Adkins/Atkinson) Family F25069
 

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